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Before he lost his arm, this chef loved life and food. Now? He still does.

Chef Eduardo Garcia combines his passion for food and his taste for adventure.

Before he lost his arm, this chef loved life and food. Now? He still does.
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Saucony

Eduardo's a chef. But he doesn't spend all his time in the kitchen — no way.

He takes off each day from his Montana home to explore the wilderness and gather all the fresh, wild ingredients he wants to use in his next meal.


Eduardo gathers food to use in his next tasty meal. All images by Saucony.

For many years, he was always on the go, working on boats as a private chef. Every chance he got, he was off to explore, soaking up as much of the local culture as he possible could. His way of getting to know each new locale? The food.

Food, he says, is his “language to connect with other people."

Take a look at how he does that, here:

Side note: Wowww, did you see those dishes he's making? Needless to say, they look amazing.

But as Eduardo describes in the video, cooking isn't the only thing that keeps him ticking.

'Cause he's not just a chef, he's also a runner and an explorer.

"Running is part of my recipe, it's part of my equation," Eduardo explains. "You pick up this rhythmic cadence of your heart, in tune with your ... spirit and your soul." Running, he says, is his way of staying connected to the outdoors.

And in turn, that relationship with nature is what inspires his culinary creations — what's in season? What can he forage today? Gathering wild, fresh ingredients is his favorite part of cooking. Well, second to sharing his delicious food with friends.

“Every day," he says, "is like another opportunity to push a little harder and to figure out how to milk more out of my life. Daily."

"To run is to keep me in the outdoors," he says.

In 2011, Eduardo lost an arm as a result of a backcountry accident.

But despite having his hook-handed prosthetic for only a few years, it certainly doesn't hold him back.

In fact, he prefers the hook to the five-fingered prosthetic he wore for a few months. "When you're cooking ... it's a dance almost," he told Katie Couric in an interview. "When I had the hand, I just didn't feel fluid, whereas with the hook ... I just rock and roll again."

Eduardo talkin' about life.

When Eduardo was first learning to use the prosthetic, he said, “It's definitely been an exploration. … It's OK to screw up, it's OK to not get it right, it's OK to not be as efficient as you were. You'll get it, you'll get it, you'll get it."

“Food and meals should enrich our lives, not just our bodies."

Eduardo's passion for exploring and foraging is one that he simply can't keep to himself. He loves to spark up conversations with friends, teach them about foraging, and share his energy with others.

Safe to say, his enthusiasm is infectious.

After years of controversy over players kneeling during the national anthem before sporting events, an NBA team has done something unique. They simply stopped playing the anthem altogether.

They didn't make an announcement. No one on the team or in management or ownership mentioned it. The 13 games that the Dallas Mavericks have played at home this preseason and regular season did not start with the national anthem, and pretty much no one even noticed.

Mavericks owner Mark Cuban confirmed today that he had nixed playing the anthem at the American Airlines Center games and had no plans to play it in the future. He told ESPN that he had made the decision after consulting NBA commissioner Adam Silver.

Cuban has expressed support for and solidarity with players who knelt during the anthem to protest racial injustice and police brutality in recent years, after saying in 2017 that he hoped players would stand.

After news broke about Cuban not playing the anthem at games, the NBA issued the following statement:

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Courtesy of Maketto

Maketto, a communal marketplace located in Washington D.C. that combines retail, restaurant and cafe experiences.

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As the cold, dark days of winter carry on, restaurants all over the country are struggling to keep patrons coming in the proverbial door. Despite expensive and elaborate upgrades to help make restaurant dining safer, the one-two punch of the pandemic and frigid temperatures has done a number on restaurants' cash flow. Already, 17% of all restaurants in the United States have permanently closed since the start of the pandemic.

The National Restaurant Association described the industry as being "in an economic free-fall" in their plea to the U.S. House of Representatives, for some economic relief. If no help is received, they expect 58% of restaurants to continue furloughs and layoffs in the first quarter of the year.

There are, however, some big businesses doing their part to support the restaurant industry in its time of need. Capital One, for example, is taking a multi-pronged approach to helping the restaurant industry. One of those initiatives is providing over 30 restaurants nationwide with funding to safely and successfully winterize their outdoor dining options so they can stay open and keep their occupancy up.

"Restaurants are anchors in the communities in which we live and work, which is why we're providing them support so they can better access the tools they need to survive these difficult winter months," says Monica Bauder, Head of Cardholder Access at Capital One. "At Capital One, the dining industry has always been an important community to us and we want to continue to find ways to help them through this difficult time."

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Sumo Citrus
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Don Bay has been in the citrus business for over 50 years now, and according to him, his most recent growing endeavor has been the most challenging. Alongside his son Darren and grandson Luke, Don cultivates Sumo Citrus®, one of the most difficult fruits to grow. The Bay family runs San Joaquin Growers Ranch in Porterville, California, one of the farms where the fruit is grown in the United States.

Sumo Citrus was originally developed in Japan, and is an extraordinary hybrid of mandarin, pomelo and navel oranges.

The fruit is temperamental, and it can take time to get a thriving crop. The trees require year-round care, and it takes five years from seed to fruit until they're ready for harvest. Thanks to expert citrus growers like the Bay family though, Sumo Citrus have flourished in California. Don and his son Darren worked together through trial and error to perfect their crop of Sumo Citrus. Darren is now an expert on cultivating this famously temperamental fruit, and his son Luke is learning from him every step of the way.

Don, Darren and Luke BayAll photos courtesy of Sumo Citrus

"Luke's been involved as early as he could come out," Darren said in a YouTube video.

"Having both my son and grandson [working with me] is basically what I've dreamt about," said Don. "To have been able to develop this orchard and have them work on it and work with me — then I don't have to do all the work."

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via The Hill / YouTube

Education is one of the most reliable ways for people to climb the economic ladder. The Bureau of Labor Statistics says that in 2018, college graduates earned weekly wages that were 80% higher than those of high school graduates.

Americans with a bachelor's degree have median weekly earnings of $1,173, compared to just $712 a week for those who have a high school diploma.

One of the most affordable ways for people to get a college degree is to first start at community college. However, only 42% of first-time college students who attend a community college eventually complete a degree within eight years.

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