Most Shared

Before he lost his arm, this chef loved life and food. Now? He still does.

Chef Eduardo Garcia combines his passion for food and his taste for adventure.

True
Saucony

Eduardo's a chef. But he doesn't spend all his time in the kitchen — no way.

He takes off each day from his Montana home to explore the wilderness and gather all the fresh, wild ingredients he wants to use in his next meal.


Eduardo gathers food to use in his next tasty meal. All images by Saucony.

For many years, he was always on the go, working on boats as a private chef. Every chance he got, he was off to explore, soaking up as much of the local culture as he possible could. His way of getting to know each new locale? The food.

Food, he says, is his “language to connect with other people."

Take a look at how he does that, here:

Side note: Wowww, did you see those dishes he's making? Needless to say, they look amazing.

But as Eduardo describes in the video, cooking isn't the only thing that keeps him ticking.

'Cause he's not just a chef, he's also a runner and an explorer.

"Running is part of my recipe, it's part of my equation," Eduardo explains. "You pick up this rhythmic cadence of your heart, in tune with your ... spirit and your soul." Running, he says, is his way of staying connected to the outdoors.

And in turn, that relationship with nature is what inspires his culinary creations — what's in season? What can he forage today? Gathering wild, fresh ingredients is his favorite part of cooking. Well, second to sharing his delicious food with friends.

“Every day," he says, "is like another opportunity to push a little harder and to figure out how to milk more out of my life. Daily."

"To run is to keep me in the outdoors," he says.

In 2011, Eduardo lost an arm as a result of a backcountry accident.

But despite having his hook-handed prosthetic for only a few years, it certainly doesn't hold him back.

In fact, he prefers the hook to the five-fingered prosthetic he wore for a few months. "When you're cooking ... it's a dance almost," he told Katie Couric in an interview. "When I had the hand, I just didn't feel fluid, whereas with the hook ... I just rock and roll again."

Eduardo talkin' about life.

When Eduardo was first learning to use the prosthetic, he said, “It's definitely been an exploration. … It's OK to screw up, it's OK to not get it right, it's OK to not be as efficient as you were. You'll get it, you'll get it, you'll get it."

“Food and meals should enrich our lives, not just our bodies."

Eduardo's passion for exploring and foraging is one that he simply can't keep to himself. He loves to spark up conversations with friends, teach them about foraging, and share his energy with others.

Safe to say, his enthusiasm is infectious.

True

It takes a special type of person to become a nurse. The job requires a combination of energy, empathy, clear mind, oftentimes a strong stomach, and a cheerful attitude. And while people typically think of nursing in a clinical setting, some nurses are driven to work with the people that feel forgotten by society.

Keep Reading Show less
via Pexels

The Emperor of the Seas.

Imagine retiring early and spending the rest of your life on a cruise ship visiting exotic locations, meeting interesting people and eating delectable food. It sounds fantastic, but surely it’s a billionaire’s fantasy, right?

Not according to Angelyn Burk, 53, and her husband Richard. They’re living their best life hopping from ship to ship for around $44 a night each. The Burks have called cruise ships their home since May 2021 and have no plans to go back to their lives as landlubbers. Angelyn took her first cruise in 1992 and it changed her goals in life forever.

“Our original plan was to stay in different countries for a month at a time and eventually retire to cruise ships as we got older,” Angelyn told 7 News. But a few years back, Angelyn crunched the numbers and realized they could start much sooner than expected.

Keep Reading Show less

Courtesy of Elaine Ahn

True

The energy in a hospital can sometimes feel overwhelming, whether you’re experiencing it as a patient, visitor or employee. However, there are a few one-of-a-kind individuals like Elaine Ahn, an operating room registered nurse in Diamond Bar, California, who thrive under this type of constant pressure.

Keep Reading Show less

Prior to baby formula, breastfeeding was the norm, but that doesn't mean it always worked.

As if the past handful of years weren't challenging enough, the U.S. is currently dealing with a baby formula crisis.

Due to a perfect storm of supply chain issues, product recalls, labor shortages and inflation, manufacturers are struggling to keep up with formula demand and retailers are rationing supplies. As a result, families that rely on formula are scrambling to ensure that their babies get the food they need.

Naturally, people are weighing in on the crisis, with some throwing out simplistic advice like, "Why don't you just do what people did before baby formula was invented and just breastfeed?"

That might seem logical, unless you understand how breastfeeding works and know a bit about infant mortality throughout human history.

Keep Reading Show less

Dr. Alicia Jeffrey-Thomas teaches you how to pee.

A pelvic floor doctor from Boston, Massachusetts, has caused a stir by explaining that something we all thought was good for our health can cause real problems. In a video that has more than 5.8 million views on TikTok, Dr. Alicia Jeffrey-Thomas says we shouldn’t go pee “just in case.”

How could this be? The moment we all learned to control our bladders we were also taught to pee before going on a car trip, sitting down to watch a movie or playing sports.

The doctor posted the video as a response to TikTok user Sidneyraz, who made a video urging people to go to the bathroom whenever they get the chance. Sidneyraz is known for posting videos about things he didn’t learn until his 30s. "If you think to yourself, 'I don't have to go,' go." SidneyRaz says in the video. It sounds like common sense but evidently, he was totally wrong, just like the rest of humanity.

Keep Reading Show less