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Rapper 2 Chainz, seen here rolling on a hoverboard at an awards show, hasn't always had such a sweet life.

Photo by Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images for BET.


Growing up poor in Atlanta, Georgia, 2 Chainz (whose real name is Tauheed Epps) knows what it means to struggle. He recounted in a recent Instagram post what it was like to live without hot water and constantly go to bed hungry.

Today Epps is swimming in fame and money. But he hasn't let himself forget where he came from.

When the rapper caught word that Deirdre Plater, a single mother and wounded veteran in Georgia, had been in a tight spot for the past year, he and his charity TRU Foundation showed up big.

On Dec. 5, 2015, 2 Chainz arrived at Deirdre's door with new furniture for her apartment AND the offer to pay her rent for an entire year.

As you can imagine, it caught her off guard.

"I love to see stuff like this happen for other people, but I never thought it would happen to me," she told CBS 46.

For 2 Chainz, new furniture and rent was the least he could do – and proceeds from his Dabbing Santa holiday sweaters are helping to make it happen.

#DabbinSanta started out as a trendy guy but has grown & become a blessing. Not only did he stop eviction for this lady who ser our country and help keep a roof over her sons head but he fully furnished there home!! All of that was made possible by YOU supporting #DabbinSanta Lets keep it going!!! If you know someone in need this holiday please share your stories dabbinsanta@gmail.com
A photo posted by 2 Chainz Aka Tity Boi (@hairweavekiller) on


Deirdre had recently undergone surgery for a military-related injury and had been looking for a job for nearly a year with no luck. The assistance 2 Chainz was able to provide her helps shine a light on the importance of giving back, but it also serves as a reminder of a huge problem many American veterans face today: unemployment.

In fact, veterans face a higher unemployment rate than other Americans and are twice as likely to become chronically homeless. Circumstances that no one, let alone those who defend our freedom, should have to experience.

The stresses that come with chronic poverty and just barely making ends meet are no joke.

A 2013 study suggested that the stress of poverty is the same as pulling an all-nighter every single night, and can drop a person's IQ by 13%. 2 Chainz remembers what it was like:

I remember when we didn't have hot water and I didn't want my friends to know , so I told them it was something wrong with that bathroom and they couldn't use my mommas, i remember using the oven to heat the house , I would stand in the kitchen for hours to stay warm . I remember waiting until the water co. Close at 5 ,so we could use a tool and turn the water back on until 6 am , I remember going to sleep hungry , i remember a long ass extension chord coming from the neighbors house to mine to borrow they're lights ,I remember stealing cable , cars , clothes etc, no matter how much pain I endured I smiled on the outside , it was my defense mechanism. I remember 🙏🏿
A photo posted by 2 Chainz Aka Tity Boi (@hairweavekiller) on


Hopefully, thanks to the generosity, Dierdre will be able to get back on her feet now that she doesn't have to worry about keeping a roof over her family's head.

2 Chainz is also making sure that his kids, who are growing up in very different circumstances, understand the importance of giving back too.

Showing my kids how important it is to give back , when you got it .#TRU
A photo posted by 2 Chainz Aka Tity Boi (@hairweavekiller) on

It's always great to see those with extra giving back and helping others out. Whether it's donating money or time, good deeds can not only put the "happy" in "happy holidays," they can transform lives and future generations.

And really, at the end of the day, it's just the right thing to do.

Check out 2 Chainz visiting Deirdre below (the good part is at 58 seconds):

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