A popular blogger responded to a rude comment about her gray hair in the best way.

As Rachel Farnsworth knows all too well, you can't run a popular blog without getting a few nasty comments along the way.

Photo by Rachel Farnsworth used with permission

The 31-year-old mom behind the booming recipe blog The Stay at Home Chef says she gets a couple of negative or critical comments every week on her blog, Facebook page, or YouTube channel.


Usually, she just ignores them. Or, if they're profane, she deletes them.

But one rude comment recently struck a much deeper nerve, and for the first time in the eight-year history of her blog, Farnsworth felt like she had to respond.

In a Facebook video, she beautifully called out one recent commenter who said her gray hairs made her look like "an old hag."

Facing the camera in front of an all-black background, she calmly explained why she felt this particular comment warranted a response:

"If you read my about me page, you'll find that I have a rare autoimmune disease that means I will most likely never live to be 70 years old. Every sign of aging that I have is a sign that I'm still alive.

A lot of people don't get the privilege to ever live to be old. And I probably won't either. Which means that I don't have time to waste criticizing myself and I don't have time to waste criticizing other people. I care a lot more about what my life is like right now."

From there, she talked about her long and difficult journey to love the body she has, "flaws" and all, and why the world needs more people with the courage to be who they are.

Why My Gray Hairs Make Me Happy

Someone recently commented on my blog and said I look like an old hag with my gray hairs. This is my response. www.thestayathomechef.com

Posted by The Stay At Home Chef on Wednesday, November 23, 2016

But the message here isn't just about Farnsworth's unique battle with body image. It's also about how people treat each other and, more importantly, how we treat ourselves.

The video has been viewed over 4 million times, and in addition to thousands of Likes and comments, Farnsworth said she's been flooded with people sharing their own stories of how they've learned to love themselves.

"It's been people encouraging each other to stand up to online bullying and building each other up with kindness," she says. "It's a really humbling experience."

True

Davina Agudelo was born in Miami, Florida, but she grew up in Medellín, Colombia.

"I am so grateful for my upbringing in Colombia, surrounded by mountains and mango trees, and for my Colombian family," Agudelo says. "Colombia is the place where I learned what's truly essential in life." It's also where she found her passion for the arts.

While she was growing up, Colombia was going through a violent drug war, and Agudelo turned to literature, theater, singing, and creative writing as a refuge. "Journaling became a sacred practice, where I could leave on the page my dreams & longings as well as my joy and sadness," she says. "During those years, poetry came to me naturally. My grandfather was a poet and though I never met him, maybe there is a little bit of his love for poetry within me."

In 1998, when she left her home and everyone she loved and moved to California, the arts continued to be her solace and comfort. She got her bachelor's degree in theater arts before getting certified in journalism at UCLA. It was there she realized the need to create a media platform that highlighted the positive contributions of LatinX in the US.

"I know the power that storytelling and writing our own stories have and how creative writing can aid us in our own transformation."

In 2012, she started Alegría Magazine and it was a great success. Later, she refurbished a van into a mobile bookstore to celebrate Latin American and LatinX indie authors and poets, while also encouraging children's reading and writing in low-income communities across Southern California.

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via Grahame / Flickr, @imeyrick / TikTok

The UK is experiencing record-breaking weather this week. England reached its hottest temperature of the year on Tuesday when it hit 32.2°C at Heathrow Airport in west London. Temperatures in Northern Ireland reached an all-time high when 31.3°C was recorded at Castlederg the next day.

However, when you translate Celsius to Fahrenheit, the temperatures don't seem to be that extreme, at least to an American. Thirty-two degrees celsius is only 89.6° F. When you compare the temperatures in the UK to an average July day in Las Vegas, Nevada where it'll hit 107°F, the British seem a little weak.

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