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A Guy Went In For A Good-Night Kiss, And It Resulted In A Punch To The Face. Here's What He Did.

This week I'm giving out the #BreakTheInternet award to a guy named Cole Ledford.

A Guy Went In For A Good-Night Kiss, And It Resulted In A Punch To The Face. Here's What He Did.

This is Cole. Take a gander at his handsome mug.


ADORBS.

And this?

Even better.

He's basically a *hugging rock star of happiness* for many people.

Cole makes good grades, volunteers, gives speeches, plays sports, and is a member of a fraternity on his college campus.

Cole is also gay. He's got a boyfriend, and they make a damn adorable couple, don't you think?

Earlier this week, Cole and his boyfriend had a fun dinner together, and afterwards, they kissed each other good night. Like any normal couple would.

Unfortunately, Cole says, a random dude saw the kiss happen and followed Cole to his car. Cole says he began calling him awful names then punched him in the face.

Later that night, Cole took to Twitter to send a message.

    "I'm sorry that you called me fag. I'm sorry you hit me for no reason. I'm sorry whatever insecurities you have don't allow you to accept others for who they are. I'm sorry I threaten you.

    I'm NOT sorry I'm gay. I'm proud to be this way. I'm proud to be confident enough to love who I love and to love me. I'm proud to have friends and family that love me regardless of me. Honestly, I'm not sorry."

HOLY. EMPOWERMENT.

I mean, a response like that take guts. A *lot* of guts. And he nailed it.

As you can imagine, the Internet took notice. Even Lance Bass joined the conversation!

In case you need a refresher, this is former N'SYNC pop star Lance Bass.

But the message doesn't stop here, folks.

Following the outpouring of support from across the globe, Cole and his boyfriend have just one more thing they'd like to tell the world:

Love > hate.

Share this message if you agree, and spread the love.

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