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7 photos from Jude Law's trip to a migrant camp in France.

A look inside Jude Law's visit to Calais, France.

7 photos from Jude Law's trip to a migrant camp in France.

1. On Sunday, Feb. 21, 2016, Jude Law dropped by the "Jungle" to perform on stage.

Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images.


It was a far cry from one of the actor's typical performance venues.

2. The "Jungle" is a camp for migrants and refugees in Calais, France, who have no other place to go.

Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images.

Many of the roughly 4,000 individuals living in the makeshift camp are refugees from countries like Iraq, Syria, and Afghanistan. They've been uprooted from their homelands and forced to abandon their entire lives due to war.

3. But Law wasn't there just to put on a good show...

Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images.

Although his performance was a powerful one.

Law was just one of several notable English artists who stopped by for a Letters Live event, where performers read moving, historical letters to the crowd of camp inhabitants. The letter Law read was one written by German-Jewish novelist Lion Feuchtwanger, whose letter addressed Nazi occupiers in his home during World War II.

Plenty of other groups have helped bring a bit of fun and entertainment into refugee camps when times are dark — from Shakespeare's Globe Theatre to Clowns Without Borders. It's nice for these folks to have a reason to smile when times are so tough.

4. Law was also there to fight on behalf of the refugees. Because soon, many may find themselves in an even more dire situation.

Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images.

The living conditions at Calais are hard for any family to endure, to say the least. Unfit, to say the most. One recent study found inhabitants were living in rat-infested homes and tents, that the water was contaminated with feces and was unsafe for drinking, and many refugees were burdened with a range of untreated medical conditions — from PTSD to tuberculosis.

Photo by Denis Charlet/AFP/Getty Images.

The study found Calais was "far below any minimum standards for refugee camps.”

To make matters worse, local officials have plans to demolish a huge portion of the camp. They're aiming to reduce the population there by 1,000, but activists — who are hoping a court hearing on Feb. 23 will halt demolition plans — say the move will harm many more.

Despite officials claiming everyone who's forced to leave will have a suitable place to go, grassroots groups in Calais say the hundreds of orphans at the camp have not been given adequate alternatives.

5. As part of his visit, Law toured the camp and spoke to the press about how the plans to demolish parts of the "Jungle" will harm children especially.

Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images.

"It just seemed to me that the pressing issue is the kids who are unaccompanied and living in awful conditions," Law said in a video by The Guardian. "It seems that their plight needed to be highlighted."

He went on to explain that the demolition will take out "key communal centers," like a women and children's center, a youth center, mosques, and a clinic.

6. Law isn't the only public figure hoping to stop officials from demolishing the camp.

He's one of 145 people of influence — including Idris Elba, Helena Bonham Carter, Richard Branson, Benedict Cumberbatch, and Stephen Fry — who've signed an open letter from the group Help Refugees addressed to U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron to up efforts helping the inhabitants, particularly children, in Calais.

Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images.

The U.K. government is feeling the heat from activists to take action because many of the migrants and refugees staying in Calais, which is near the English Channel, came in hopes of making it into Britain, where many have family members.

“This is a humanitarian crisis that needs to be acknowledged as such," the letter reads. "And it is imperative that we do everything we can to help these innocent and highly vulnerable refugees, especially the minors, as swiftly as is humanly possible.”

7. The problem in Calais is part of a much larger global crisis.

Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images.

In case you haven't tuned in to the news recently, the entire world has been grappling in recent years with how to handle the massive influx of refugees out of war-torn regions of the Middle East and Africa. In the U.S., the debate over if we should accept refugees (and, if so, how many) has been a point of contention throughout the presidential campaign, with candidates' views ranging dramatically — from significantly upping the number of refugees the country lets in to banning all Muslims from even entering the country.

After learning about the brutal conditions these families and children are living in, the former is certainly more humane and reasonable than leaving them all out in the cold.

True

We're redefining what normal means in these uncertain times, and although this is different for all of us, love continues to transform us for the better.

Love is what united Marie-Claire and David Archbold, who met while taking a photography class. "We went into the darkroom to see what developed," they joke—and after a decade of marriage, they know firsthand the deep commitment and connection romantic love requires.

All photos courtesy of Marie-Claire and David Archbold

However, their relationship became even sweeter when they adopted James: a little boy with a huge heart.

In the United States alone, there are roughly 122,000 children awaiting adoption according to the latest report from the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. While the goal is always for a child to be parented by and stay with their biological family, that is not always a possibility. This is where adoption offers hope—not only does it create new families, it gives birth parents an avenue through which to see their child flourish when they are not able to parent. For the right families, it's a beautiful thing.

The Archbolds knew early on that adoption was an option for them. David has three daughters from a previous marriage, but knowing their family was not yet complete, the couple embarked on a two-year journey to find their match. When the adoption agency called and told them about James, they were elated. From the moment they met him, the Archbolds knew he was meant to be part of their family. David locked eyes with the brown-eyed baby and they stared at each other in quiet wonder for such a long time that the whole room fell silent. "He still looks at me like that," said David.

The connection was mutual and instantaneous—love at first sight. The Archbolds knew that James was meant to be a part of their family. However, they faced significant challenges requiring an even deeper level of commitment due to James' medical condition.

James was born with congenital hyperinsulinism, a rare condition that causes his body to overproduce insulin, and within 2 months of his birth, he had to have surgery to remove 90% of his pancreas. There was a steep learning curve for the Archbolds, but they were already in love, and knew they were committed to the ongoing care that'd be required of bringing James into their lives. After lots of research and encouragement from James' medical team, they finally brought their son home.

Today, three-year-old James is thriving, filled with infectious joy that bubbles over and touches every person who comes in contact with him. "Part of love is when people recognize that they need to be with each other," said his adoptive grandfather. And because the Archbolds opted for an open adoption, there are even more people to love and support James as he grows.

This sweet story is brought to you by Sumo Citrus®. This oversized mandarin is celebrated for its incredible taste and distinct looks. Sumo Citrus is super-sweet, enormous, easy-to-peel, seedless, and juicy without the mess. Fans of the fruit are obsessive, stocking up from January to April when Sumo Citrus is in stores. To learn more, visit sumocitrus.com and @sumocitrus.

Over my own 20+ years of motherhood, I've written a lot about breastfeeding. My mom was a lactation consultant, I breastfed all three of my children through toddlerhood, and I've engaged in many lengthy debates about breastfeeding in public.

But in all that time, I've never seen a video that encapsulates the reality of the early days of breastfeeding like the Frida Mom ad that aired on NBC during the Golden Globes. And I've never seen a more perfect depiction of the full, raw reality of it than the uncensored version that bares too much full breast to be aired on network television.

The 30-second for-TV version is great and can be seen in this clip from ET Canada. The commentary that accompanies it is refreshing as well. We do need to normalize breastfeeding. We do need to see breasts in a context other than a sexualized one that caters to the male gaze. We do need to let new moms know they are not the only ones feeling the way they feel.


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True

We're redefining what normal means in these uncertain times, and although this is different for all of us, love continues to transform us for the better.

Love is what united Marie-Claire and David Archbold, who met while taking a photography class. "We went into the darkroom to see what developed," they joke—and after a decade of marriage, they know firsthand the deep commitment and connection romantic love requires.

All photos courtesy of Marie-Claire and David Archbold

However, their relationship became even sweeter when they adopted James: a little boy with a huge heart.

In the United States alone, there are roughly 122,000 children awaiting adoption according to the latest report from the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. While the goal is always for a child to be parented by and stay with their biological family, that is not always a possibility. This is where adoption offers hope—not only does it create new families, it gives birth parents an avenue through which to see their child flourish when they are not able to parent. For the right families, it's a beautiful thing.

The Archbolds knew early on that adoption was an option for them. David has three daughters from a previous marriage, but knowing their family was not yet complete, the couple embarked on a two-year journey to find their match. When the adoption agency called and told them about James, they were elated. From the moment they met him, the Archbolds knew he was meant to be part of their family. David locked eyes with the brown-eyed baby and they stared at each other in quiet wonder for such a long time that the whole room fell silent. "He still looks at me like that," said David.

The connection was mutual and instantaneous—love at first sight. The Archbolds knew that James was meant to be a part of their family. However, they faced significant challenges requiring an even deeper level of commitment due to James' medical condition.

James was born with congenital hyperinsulinism, a rare condition that causes his body to overproduce insulin, and within 2 months of his birth, he had to have surgery to remove 90% of his pancreas. There was a steep learning curve for the Archbolds, but they were already in love, and knew they were committed to the ongoing care that'd be required of bringing James into their lives. After lots of research and encouragement from James' medical team, they finally brought their son home.

Today, three-year-old James is thriving, filled with infectious joy that bubbles over and touches every person who comes in contact with him. "Part of love is when people recognize that they need to be with each other," said his adoptive grandfather. And because the Archbolds opted for an open adoption, there are even more people to love and support James as he grows.

This sweet story is brought to you by Sumo Citrus®. This oversized mandarin is celebrated for its incredible taste and distinct looks. Sumo Citrus is super-sweet, enormous, easy-to-peel, seedless, and juicy without the mess. Fans of the fruit are obsessive, stocking up from January to April when Sumo Citrus is in stores. To learn more, visit sumocitrus.com and @sumocitrus.

Kara Coley, a bartender at Sipps in Gulfport, Mississippi, got an unusual phone call on the job last week.

Photo courtesy of Kara Coley.

"Good evening," Coley answered. "Thank you for calling Sipps!"

A woman on the other end of the line asked, "Is this a gay bar?"

Sipps welcomes everyone, Coley explained to her, but indeed attracts a mostly LGBTQ crowd.



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The Hill/Twitter

It was a mere three weeks ago that President Biden announced that the U.S. would have enough vaccine supply to cover every adult American by the end of July. At the time, that was good news.

Today, he's bumped up that date by two full months.

That's great news.

In his announcement to the nation, Biden outlined the updated process for getting the country immunized against COVID-19.


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