This adorable thing is a baby one-horned rhino.

A three-day old calf was found wandering alone in early July, before the flooding. Photo by Luit Chaliha/AFP/Getty Images.


It is possibly one of the cutest things on the planet, and if it were up to me, I would name it Harvey ... or maybe Abernathy. Or The Chuckster.

Anyway, these little babies live in northeast India, in the state of Assam.

But massive floods at Kaziranga National Park have put those adorable babies in danger of being washed away.

Swimming through flood waters. Photo by -/AFP/Getty Images.

Their home in Kaziranga was hit by serious flooding. Monsoon rains caused the nearby river, the Brahmaputra, to flood its banks. And the flooding's already displaced a lot of people, but the rhinos are being affected as well.

The flooding also hit the nearby Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary, where this mom and baby found safety on high ground.

Photo by Biju Boro/AFP/Getty Images.

Floods have been affecting low-lying areas throughout Assam.

Luckily, there are people to help the baby rhinos. At least six of the rhinos were rescued this week by dedicated workers.

A baby calf being rescued. Photo by Subhamoy Bhattacharjee/AFP/Getty Images.

That's according to Rathin Barman, an official at a wildlife research center in Kaziranga. As for the specific number of rescued rhinos, The Guardian puts the number at six, but PTI, an Indian news site, reports eight.

The babies were separated from their moms during the flood, but workers were able to scoop them up and shepherd them to safety.


A rescued calf is boated to safety after being found in flood waters. Photo by Subhamoy Bhattacharjee/AFP/Getty Images.

The rescued baby rhinos are staying at a sanctuary, and they will be released back to the wild once it's safe.

A 3-month-old baby boy is fed at an animal nursery. Photo by Subhamoy Bhattacharjee/AFP/Getty Images.

Kaziranga also helps to protect the rhinos from poachers. And it's home to many other animal species, too, like elephants.

Rhinos are amazing creatures, and it's so heartwarming to see people striking out to help save and protect them.

A baby rhino in Kaziranga in early June, before the flooding. Photo by Biju Boro/AFP/Getty Images.

A lot of rhino species are pretty endangered thanks to poaching and habitat loss. But because of awesome humans like these fine folks risking their safety to save endangered animals, we can be sure that our future grandkids can all have a Chuckster of their own.

I live in Washington, the state with the first official outbreak of COVID-19 in the U.S. While my family lives several hours from Seattle, it was alarming to be near the epicenter—especially early in the pandemic when we knew even less about the coronavirus than we know now.

As tracking websites went up and statistics started pouring in, things looked hairy for Washington. But not for long. We could have and should have shut everything down faster than we did, but Governor Inslee took the necessary steps to keep the virus from flying completely out of control. He's consistently gotten heat from all sides, but in general he listened to the infectious disease experts and followed the lead of public health officials—which is exactly what government needs to do in a pandemic.

As a result, we've spent the past several months watching Washington state drop from the #1 hotspot down to 23rd in the nation (as of today) for total coronavirus cases. In cases per million population, we're faring even better at number 38. We have a few counties where outbreaks are pretty bad, and cases have slowly started to rise as the state has reopened—which was to be expected—but I've felt quite satisfied with how it's been handled at the state level. The combination of strong state leadership and county-by-county reopenings has born statistically impressive results—especially considering the fact that we didn't have the lead time that other states did to prepare for the outbreak.

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