6 adorable baby rhinos were rescued from flood waters. The pictures are amazing.

This adorable thing is a baby one-horned rhino.

A three-day old calf was found wandering alone in early July, before the flooding. Photo by Luit Chaliha/AFP/Getty Images.


It is possibly one of the cutest things on the planet, and if it were up to me, I would name it Harvey ... or maybe Abernathy. Or The Chuckster.

Anyway, these little babies live in northeast India, in the state of Assam.

But massive floods at Kaziranga National Park have put those adorable babies in danger of being washed away.

Swimming through flood waters. Photo by -/AFP/Getty Images.

Their home in Kaziranga was hit by serious flooding. Monsoon rains caused the nearby river, the Brahmaputra, to flood its banks. And the flooding's already displaced a lot of people, but the rhinos are being affected as well.

The flooding also hit the nearby Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary, where this mom and baby found safety on high ground.

Photo by Biju Boro/AFP/Getty Images.

Floods have been affecting low-lying areas throughout Assam.

Luckily, there are people to help the baby rhinos. At least six of the rhinos were rescued this week by dedicated workers.

A baby calf being rescued. Photo by Subhamoy Bhattacharjee/AFP/Getty Images.

That's according to Rathin Barman, an official at a wildlife research center in Kaziranga. As for the specific number of rescued rhinos, The Guardian puts the number at six, but PTI, an Indian news site, reports eight.

The babies were separated from their moms during the flood, but workers were able to scoop them up and shepherd them to safety.


A rescued calf is boated to safety after being found in flood waters. Photo by Subhamoy Bhattacharjee/AFP/Getty Images.

The rescued baby rhinos are staying at a sanctuary, and they will be released back to the wild once it's safe.

A 3-month-old baby boy is fed at an animal nursery. Photo by Subhamoy Bhattacharjee/AFP/Getty Images.

Kaziranga also helps to protect the rhinos from poachers. And it's home to many other animal species, too, like elephants.

Rhinos are amazing creatures, and it's so heartwarming to see people striking out to help save and protect them.

A baby rhino in Kaziranga in early June, before the flooding. Photo by Biju Boro/AFP/Getty Images.

A lot of rhino species are pretty endangered thanks to poaching and habitat loss. But because of awesome humans like these fine folks risking their safety to save endangered animals, we can be sure that our future grandkids can all have a Chuckster of their own.

'Merry Christmas' on YouTube.

The world must have been—mostly—good this year. Because Elton John and Ed Sheeran have teamed up to gift us all with a brand new Christmas single.

The song, aptly named “Merry Christmas,” is a perfect blend of silly and sweet that’s cheery, bright and just a touch bizarre.

Created with the holiday spirit in every way, it has whimsical snowball fights, snow angels (basically all the snow things), festive sweaters, iconic throwbacks and twinkling lights galore. Plus all profits from the tune are dedicated to two charities: the Ed Sheeran Suffolk Music Foundation and the Elton John AIDS Foundation.

I personally don’t know which is more of a highlight: Ed Sheeran channeling his inner-Mariah, performing a faux sexy dance in a leg revealing Santa outfit, or him flying through the air with a giant Frosty the Snowman … who seems to be sporting glasses similar to Elton’s. Are we meant to believe that Elton is the Snowman? This music video even has mystery.
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Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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