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25 images from around the world show solidarity with France after tragedy.

People are joining together in mourning and solidarity for the victims of Friday's attacks in Paris.

On Friday, Nov. 13, more than 120 people died as the result of a series of gun and bomb attacks across Paris.

The world watched as news of the attacks made its way from the French capital.

For a sense of scale, yesterday's events marked the deadliest attack on European soil since the 2004 Madrid train bombings that killed 191 and left 1,841 injured.


Facebook moved quickly, enabling its new "Safety Check" feature, aimed at helping people near the attacks let their friends and family know they're safe.

Bullet holes on the window of Le Carillon bar. Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images.

Across the city, people are mourning the tragic loss of life.

Flowers left on the blood-stained pavement outside the Bataclan theater, site of the most deadly of Friday's attacks. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

A woman mourns outside Le Carillon in the 10th arrondissement Saturday morning. Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

A woman lights a candle outside Le Carillon the day after the attacks. Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images.

On Saturday morning, a man played John Lennon's "Imagine" on a piano outside the Bataclan theater.

A large crowd gathered to listen his performance of Lennon's 1971 classic outside the theater where at least 87 people were killed in the Friday night attack.

"Imagine all the people, living life in peace."

A man plays to a crowd outside the Bataclan theater. Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

The morning after the attacks, crowds in Paris lined up to donate blood.

With more than 200 people hospitalized in the wake of the attacks, it's heartening to see people so ready to help in whatever way they can.

People gather to give blood near Le Carillon. Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images.

Around the world, cities joined in solidarity with Paris, lighting up monuments in blue, white, and red.

New York City, United States

One World Trade Center. Photo by Daniel Pierce Wright/Getty Images.

Employee Oscar Castillo draws "Pray for Paris" on the door of the popular Brooklyn French restaurant Bar Tabac. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Mexico City

The Mexican Senate building. Photo by Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images.

Seoul, South Korea

Demonstrators held a candlelight vigil outside Seoul's French embassy. Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images.

London, England



London's National Gallery. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

People hold supportive signs in front of the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

Shanghai, China

The Oriental Pearl Tower on Friday night. Photo by Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images.

Sydney, Australia

The Sydney Opera House. Photo by Daniel Munoz/Getty Images.

Sydney citizens gather for a vigil at Martin Place. Photo by Daniel Munoz/Getty Images.

Auckland, New Zealand

The Auckland War Memorial Museum. Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images.

A vigil at Auckland's Aotea Square. Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images.

Berlin, Germany

The Brandenburg Gate. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

Outside the French embassy in Berlin. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

A hand-written sign in French reads: "We suffer with France" among flowers and candles at the gate of Berlin's French embassy. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

No matter where people were in the world, they turned up with flowers and candles to stand in solidarity with France.

Istanbul, Turkey

Outside the French consulate in Istanbul. Photo by YASIN AKGUL/AFP/Getty Images.

Tehran, Iran

Iranians pay tribute to the victims of the attacks in Paris outside the French embassy in Tehran. Photo by ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images.

Hong Kong, China

Photo by Xaume Olleros/Getty Images.

Moscow, Russia

Flowers outside the French embassy in Moscow. Photo by Dmitry Serebryakov/AFP/Getty Images.

Geneva, Switzerland

Photo by Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images.

Quito, Ecuador


At the "Alliance Francaise" in Quito. Photo by Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images.

Thessaloniki, Greece

Outside the French consulate in Thessaloniki. Photo by Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images.

Rome, Italy

Flowers and a peace sign outside the French embassy in Rome. Photo by Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images.

A candlelight vigil in the Piazza del Popolo in Rome. Photo by Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images.

In times of chaos and destruction, it's important to believe in the power of human kindness.

These types of attacks are meant to disrupt. These types of attacks are meant to provoke the world. In these times, it's crucial we look at those who refuse to respond out of hatred or vengeance, but instead with a message of love and peace.

Nature

Pennsylvania home is the entrance to a cave that’s been closed for 70 years

You can only access the cave from the basement of the home and it’s open for business.

This Pennsylvania home is the entrance to a cave.

Have you ever seen something in a movie or online and thought, "That's totally fake," only to find out it's absolutely a real thing? That's sort of how this house in Pennsylvania comes across. It just seems too fantastical to be real, and yet somehow it actually exists.

The home sits between Greencastle and Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, and houses a pretty unique public secret. There's a cave in the basement. Not a man cave or a basement that makes you feel like you're in a cave, but an actual cave that you can't get to unless you go through the house.

Turns out the cave was discovered in the 1830s on the land of John Coffey, according to Uncovering PA, but the story of how it was found is unclear. People would climb down into the cave to explore occasionally until the land was leased about 100 years later and a small structure was built over the cave opening.

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Thanks to Lifeboost, good coffee can be good for everyone.

Unsplash

Lifeboost coffee

Americans love coffee. Like, we really, seriously, truly love it. According to one recent survey, 75 percent of U.S. adults drink coffee at least occasionally, while 53 percent—about 110 million people—drink it every single day. For some, coffee is an essential part of their morning ritual. For others, it’s something they enjoy when they hit the proverbial wall in the late afternoon. But either way, millions of people use coffee to boost energy, focus, and productivity.


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13-year-old ventriloquist sings incredible, sassy version of 'You Don't Own Me' on 'AGT'

Ana-Maria Mărgean only started her hobby in 2020 and is already wowing audiences on "America's Got Talent."

America's Got Talent/Youtube

Ana-Maria Mărgean singing "You Don't Own Me" on "America's Got Talent"

It’s not every day a ventriloquist act is so jaw-dropping that it has to be seen to be believed. But when it does happen, it’s usually on “America’s Got Talent.”

Ana-Maria Mărgean was only 11 years old when she first took to the stage on “Romania’s Got Talent” to show off her ventriloquism skills, an act inspired by videos of fellow ventriloquist and “America’s Got Talent” Season 2 champion Terry Fator.

Using puppets built for her by her parents, the young performer tirelessly spent her quarantine time in 2020 learning how to bring them to life, which led to her receiving a Golden Buzzer and eventually winning the entire series in Romania.

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Linda Ronstadt's 1970's ballad is a chart-topping hit once again thanks to 'The Last of Us'

The iconic 70s song "Long, Long Time" was an integral part of an unforgettable episode that fans are calling a masterpiece.

Linda Ronstadt (left), Nick Offerman and Murray Bartlett (right)

HBO’s emotional third episode of the zombie series “The Last Of Us” became an instant favorite among fans, thanks in no small part to Linda Ronstadt’s late 1970s ballad, “Long, Long Time.”

Using the song as the episode’s title, “Long, Long Time,” moves away from the show’s main plot to instead focus on a heartbreakingly beautiful love story between Bill (Nick Offerman) and Frank (Murray Bartlett), from its endearing start all the way to its bittersweet end.

The song makes its first appearance during the initial stages of Bill and Frank’s romance as they play the tune on the piano, just before they share their first kiss.

We see their entire lives together play out—one of closeness, devotion, and savoring homegrown strawberries—until they meet their end. The song then plays on the radio, bringing the bottle episode to a poignant close.

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34-year-old man is learning to read on TikTok in series of motivational videos

His reading skills have improved so much that he plans to read 100 books this year.

@oliverspeaks1/TikTok

Oliver James is the biggest star on BookTok.

With over 125,000 followers, 34-year-old Oliver James is a star in the BookTok community. And it all started with a very simple goal: Learn to read.

For most kids, school is a place where they can develop a relationship with learning in a safe environment. For James, school was the opposite. Growing up with learning and behavior disabilities subjected him to abusive teaching practices in special education, which, of course, did nothing to help.

"The special education system at the time was more focused on behavioral than educating," he told Good Morning America. "So they spent a lotta time restraining us, a lotta time disciplining us, a lotta times putting us in positions to kinda shape us to just not act out in class."

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Buffy Sainte-Marie shares what led to her openly breastfeeding on 'Sesame Street' in 1977

The way she explained to Big Bird what she was doing is still an all-time great example.

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In 1977, singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie did something revolutionary: She fed her baby on Sesame Street.

The Indigenous Canadian-Ameican singer-songwriter wasn't doing anything millions of other mothers hadn't done—she was simply feeding her baby. But the fact that she was breastfeeding him was significant since breastfeeding in the United States hit an all-time low in 1971 and was just starting to make a comeback. The fact that she did it openly on a children's television program was even more notable, since "What if children see?" has been a key pearl clutch for people who criticize breastfeeding in public.

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