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25 images from around the world show solidarity with France after tragedy.

People are joining together in mourning and solidarity for the victims of Friday's attacks in Paris.

25 images from around the world show solidarity with France after tragedy.

On Friday, Nov. 13, more than 120 people died as the result of a series of gun and bomb attacks across Paris.

The world watched as news of the attacks made its way from the French capital.

For a sense of scale, yesterday's events marked the deadliest attack on European soil since the 2004 Madrid train bombings that killed 191 and left 1,841 injured.


Facebook moved quickly, enabling its new "Safety Check" feature, aimed at helping people near the attacks let their friends and family know they're safe.

Bullet holes on the window of Le Carillon bar. Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images.

Across the city, people are mourning the tragic loss of life.

Flowers left on the blood-stained pavement outside the Bataclan theater, site of the most deadly of Friday's attacks. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

A woman mourns outside Le Carillon in the 10th arrondissement Saturday morning. Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

A woman lights a candle outside Le Carillon the day after the attacks. Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images.

On Saturday morning, a man played John Lennon's "Imagine" on a piano outside the Bataclan theater.

A large crowd gathered to listen his performance of Lennon's 1971 classic outside the theater where at least 87 people were killed in the Friday night attack.

"Imagine all the people, living life in peace."

A man plays to a crowd outside the Bataclan theater. Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

The morning after the attacks, crowds in Paris lined up to donate blood.

With more than 200 people hospitalized in the wake of the attacks, it's heartening to see people so ready to help in whatever way they can.

People gather to give blood near Le Carillon. Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images.

Around the world, cities joined in solidarity with Paris, lighting up monuments in blue, white, and red.

New York City, United States

One World Trade Center. Photo by Daniel Pierce Wright/Getty Images.

Employee Oscar Castillo draws "Pray for Paris" on the door of the popular Brooklyn French restaurant Bar Tabac. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Mexico City

The Mexican Senate building. Photo by Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images.

Seoul, South Korea

Demonstrators held a candlelight vigil outside Seoul's French embassy. Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images.

London, England



London's National Gallery. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

People hold supportive signs in front of the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

Shanghai, China

The Oriental Pearl Tower on Friday night. Photo by Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images.

Sydney, Australia

The Sydney Opera House. Photo by Daniel Munoz/Getty Images.

Sydney citizens gather for a vigil at Martin Place. Photo by Daniel Munoz/Getty Images.

Auckland, New Zealand

The Auckland War Memorial Museum. Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images.

A vigil at Auckland's Aotea Square. Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images.

Berlin, Germany

The Brandenburg Gate. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

Outside the French embassy in Berlin. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

A hand-written sign in French reads: "We suffer with France" among flowers and candles at the gate of Berlin's French embassy. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

No matter where people were in the world, they turned up with flowers and candles to stand in solidarity with France.

Istanbul, Turkey

Outside the French consulate in Istanbul. Photo by YASIN AKGUL/AFP/Getty Images.

Tehran, Iran

Iranians pay tribute to the victims of the attacks in Paris outside the French embassy in Tehran. Photo by ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images.

Hong Kong, China

Photo by Xaume Olleros/Getty Images.

Moscow, Russia

Flowers outside the French embassy in Moscow. Photo by Dmitry Serebryakov/AFP/Getty Images.

Geneva, Switzerland

Photo by Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images.

Quito, Ecuador


At the "Alliance Francaise" in Quito. Photo by Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images.

Thessaloniki, Greece

Outside the French consulate in Thessaloniki. Photo by Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images.

Rome, Italy

Flowers and a peace sign outside the French embassy in Rome. Photo by Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images.

A candlelight vigil in the Piazza del Popolo in Rome. Photo by Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images.

In times of chaos and destruction, it's important to believe in the power of human kindness.

These types of attacks are meant to disrupt. These types of attacks are meant to provoke the world. In these times, it's crucial we look at those who refuse to respond out of hatred or vengeance, but instead with a message of love and peace.

True

When Sue Hoppin was in college, she met the man she was going to marry. "I was attending the University of Denver, and he was at the Air Force Academy," she says. "My dad had also attended the University of Denver and warned me not to date those flyboys from the Springs."

"He didn't say anything about marrying one of them," she says. And so began her life as a military spouse.

The life brings some real advantages, like opportunities to live abroad — her family got to live all around the US, Japan, and Germany — but it also comes with some downsides, like having to put your spouse's career over your own goals.

"Though we choose to marry someone in the military, we had career goals before we got married, and those didn't just disappear."

Career aspirations become more difficult to achieve, and progress comes with lots of starts and stops. After experiencing these unique challenges firsthand, Sue founded an organization to help other military spouses in similar situations.

Sue had gotten a degree in international relations because she wanted to pursue a career in diplomacy, but for fourteen years she wasn't able to make any headway — not until they moved back to the DC area. "Eighteen months later, many rejections later, it became apparent that this was going to be more challenging than I could ever imagine," she says.

Eighteen months is halfway through a typical assignment, and by then, most spouses are looking for their next assignment. "If I couldn't find a job in my own 'hometown' with multiple degrees and a great network, this didn't bode well for other military spouses," she says.

She's not wrong. Military spouses spend most of their lives moving with their partners, which means they're often far from family and other support networks. When they do find a job, they often make less than their civilian counterparts — and they're more likely to experience underemployment or unemployment. In fact, on some deployments, spouses are not even allowed to work.

Before the pandemic, military spouse unemployment was 22%. Since the pandemic, it's expected to rise to 35%.

Sue eventually found a job working at a military-focused nonprofit, and it helped her get the experience she needed to create her own dedicated military spouse program. She wrote a book and started saving up enough money to start the National Military Spouse Network (NMSN), which she founded in 2010 as the first organization of its kind.

"I founded the NMSN to help professional military spouses develop flexible careers they could perform from any location."

"Over the years, the program has expanded to include a free digital magazine, professional development events, drafting annual White Papers and organizing national and local advocacy to address the issues of most concern to the professional military spouse community," she says.

Not only was NMSN's mission important to Sue on a personal level she also saw it as part of something bigger than herself.

"Gone are the days when families can thrive on one salary. Like everyone else, most military families rely on two salaries to make ends meet. If a military spouse wants or needs to work, they should be able to," she says.

"When less than one percent of our population serves in the military," she continues, "we need to be able to not only recruit the best and the brightest but also retain them."

"We lose out as a nation when service members leave the force because their spouse is unable to find employment. We see it as a national security issue."

"The NMSN team has worked tirelessly to jumpstart the discussion and keep the challenges affecting military spouses top of mind. We have elevated the conversation to Congress and the White House," she continues. "I'm so proud of the fact that corporations, the government, and the general public are increasingly interested in the issues affecting military spouses and recognizing the employment roadblocks they unfairly have faced."

"We have collectively made other people care, and in doing so, we elevated the issues of military spouse unemployment to a national and global level," she adds. "In the process, we've also empowered military spouses to advocate for themselves and our community so that military spouse employment issues can continue to remain at the forefront."

Not only has NMSN become a sought-after leader in the military spouse employment space, but Sue has also seen the career she dreamed of materializing for herself. She was recently invited to participate in the public re-launch of Joining Forces, a White House initiative supporting military and veteran families, with First Lady Dr. Jill Biden.

She has also had two of her recommendations for practical solutions introduced into legislation just this year. She was the first in the Air Force community to show leadership the power of social media to reach both their airmen and their military families.

That is why Sue is one of Tory Burch's "Empowered Women" this year. The $5,000 donation will be going to The Madeira School, a school that Sue herself attended when she was in high school because, she says, "the lessons I learned there as a student pretty much set the tone for my personal and professional life. It's so meaningful to know that the donation will go towards making a Madeira education more accessible to those who may not otherwise be able to afford it and providing them with a life-changing opportunity."

Most military children will move one to three times during high school so having a continuous four-year experience at one high school can be an important gift. After traveling for much of her formative years, Sue attended Madeira and found herself "in an environment that fostered confidence and empowerment. As young women, we were expected to have a voice and advocate not just for ourselves, but for those around us."

To learn more about Tory Burch and Upworthy's Empowered Women program visit https://www.toryburch.com/empoweredwomen/. Nominate an inspiring woman in your community today!

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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