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25 images from around the world show solidarity with France after tragedy.

People are joining together in mourning and solidarity for the victims of Friday's attacks in Paris.

On Friday, Nov. 13, more than 120 people died as the result of a series of gun and bomb attacks across Paris.

The world watched as news of the attacks made its way from the French capital.

For a sense of scale, yesterday's events marked the deadliest attack on European soil since the 2004 Madrid train bombings that killed 191 and left 1,841 injured.


Facebook moved quickly, enabling its new "Safety Check" feature, aimed at helping people near the attacks let their friends and family know they're safe.

Bullet holes on the window of Le Carillon bar. Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images.

Across the city, people are mourning the tragic loss of life.

Flowers left on the blood-stained pavement outside the Bataclan theater, site of the most deadly of Friday's attacks. Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images.

A woman mourns outside Le Carillon in the 10th arrondissement Saturday morning. Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

A woman lights a candle outside Le Carillon the day after the attacks. Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images.

On Saturday morning, a man played John Lennon's "Imagine" on a piano outside the Bataclan theater.

A large crowd gathered to listen his performance of Lennon's 1971 classic outside the theater where at least 87 people were killed in the Friday night attack.

"Imagine all the people, living life in peace."

A man plays to a crowd outside the Bataclan theater. Photo by Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP/Getty Images.

The morning after the attacks, crowds in Paris lined up to donate blood.

With more than 200 people hospitalized in the wake of the attacks, it's heartening to see people so ready to help in whatever way they can.

People gather to give blood near Le Carillon. Photo by Antoine Antoniol/Getty Images.

Around the world, cities joined in solidarity with Paris, lighting up monuments in blue, white, and red.

New York City, United States

One World Trade Center. Photo by Daniel Pierce Wright/Getty Images.

Employee Oscar Castillo draws "Pray for Paris" on the door of the popular Brooklyn French restaurant Bar Tabac. Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Mexico City

The Mexican Senate building. Photo by Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images.

Seoul, South Korea

Demonstrators held a candlelight vigil outside Seoul's French embassy. Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images.

London, England



London's National Gallery. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

People hold supportive signs in front of the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square. Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

Shanghai, China

The Oriental Pearl Tower on Friday night. Photo by Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images.

Sydney, Australia

The Sydney Opera House. Photo by Daniel Munoz/Getty Images.

Sydney citizens gather for a vigil at Martin Place. Photo by Daniel Munoz/Getty Images.

Auckland, New Zealand

The Auckland War Memorial Museum. Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images.

A vigil at Auckland's Aotea Square. Photo by Hannah Peters/Getty Images.

Berlin, Germany

The Brandenburg Gate. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

Outside the French embassy in Berlin. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

A hand-written sign in French reads: "We suffer with France" among flowers and candles at the gate of Berlin's French embassy. Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images.

No matter where people were in the world, they turned up with flowers and candles to stand in solidarity with France.

Istanbul, Turkey

Outside the French consulate in Istanbul. Photo by YASIN AKGUL/AFP/Getty Images.

Tehran, Iran

Iranians pay tribute to the victims of the attacks in Paris outside the French embassy in Tehran. Photo by ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images.

Hong Kong, China

Photo by Xaume Olleros/Getty Images.

Moscow, Russia

Flowers outside the French embassy in Moscow. Photo by Dmitry Serebryakov/AFP/Getty Images.

Geneva, Switzerland

Photo by Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images.

Quito, Ecuador


At the "Alliance Francaise" in Quito. Photo by Rodrigo Buendia/AFP/Getty Images.

Thessaloniki, Greece

Outside the French consulate in Thessaloniki. Photo by Sakis Mitrolidis/AFP/Getty Images.

Rome, Italy

Flowers and a peace sign outside the French embassy in Rome. Photo by Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images.

A candlelight vigil in the Piazza del Popolo in Rome. Photo by Tiziana Fabi/AFP/Getty Images.

In times of chaos and destruction, it's important to believe in the power of human kindness.

These types of attacks are meant to disrupt. These types of attacks are meant to provoke the world. In these times, it's crucial we look at those who refuse to respond out of hatred or vengeance, but instead with a message of love and peace.

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