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25 clichés that are actually true and how they could change your life.

Sometimes we need to remind ourselves of the things we’ve learned, over and over again.

25 clichés that are actually true and how they could change your life.

Socrates, considered to be one of the founders of Western philosophy, was once called the wisest man on Earth by the Oracle of Delphi.

When Socrates heard that the oracle made that comment, he believed the statement was wrong. Socrates said, "I know one thing: that I know nothing."

How can the smartest man on Earth know nothing?

I heard this paradoxical wisdom for the first time from a teacher when I was 14 or 15. It made such an impact on me that I used Socrates’ quote as my learning strategy from then on.


"I know nothing" means, to me, that you might be an educated person, but still you can learn from everything and everyone.

One thing I like better than learning from my own mistakes is to learn from other people’s mistakes. Over the years, I’ve been blessed to have great mentors, teachers, family, and friends who have taught me about life. Of course, I learn from my own life too. But learning from others is often faster and deeper.

Plus, while we might learn things quickly, we often forget those things at the same rate. Sometimes we need to remind ourselves of the things we’ve learned, over and over again.

So here’s my list of 25 things about life that other people have taught me.

These are things that have changed my life completely and that I wish I’d known about 10 years ago.

1. Struggle is good.

Never say, "I can’t take it anymore." Say, "Bring it on!"

2. Don’t complain.

Complaining is the biggest waste of time there is. Either do something about it, and if you can’t, shut up.

3. Spend time with the people you love.

That’s your family and best friends. If you don’t have a family, create one (in whatever way that means to you). Most people in life are only visitors. Family is for life.

Photo via iStock.

4. Don’t start a relationship if you’re not in love.

I’ve done this more than once. You kind of like someone and think, "We might as well give it a shot." Not a good idea. You’re either in love, or you are not. Don’t fool yourself. It’s not fair to you and the other person.

5. Exercise daily.

I didn’t get this until recently. A healthy body is where you have to start everything in life. If you can’t build a healthy and strong body, what CAN you build in life?

6. Keep a journal.

No, keeping a journal is not for children. It helps you to become a better thinker and writer. "I don’t want to be a writer," you might think. Well, how many emails and texts do you send a day? Everybody is a writer.

7. Be grateful.

Say "thank you" to everyone and everything. "Thank you for this beautiful day." "Thank you for your email." "Thank you for being there for me."

8. Don’t care about what people think.

We all die in the end; do you really think it matters what people think of you?

9. Take more risks.

Don’t be such a wimp.

Photo via iStock.

10. Pick an industry, not a job.

If you want to become good at something, you need to spend years and years doing that. You can’t do that if you hop from industry to industry. Pick an industry you love and start at the bottom. You will find the perfect role for you eventually.

11. Lead the way.

When you find yourself in a situation where everyone looks at each other, it’s time for you to lead. You‘re a leader when you decide to become one. There’s no initiation or a title. Just a decision.

12. Money isn't important.

It really isn’t. But you have to train yourself not to care about money. Don’t become too dependent on the stuff you own — otherwise, the stuff will own you.

13. Be nice.

I don’t mean you should be a pushover. You can be someone that doesn’t take shit and be nice about it. Just don’t insult people, think you’re better than them, or act like an idiot.

14. Learn every day.

You’ve got to train your brain to stay alert. You don’t have to read a book a day to learn every day. Learn from your mistakes. Learn from the people around you — be open to what they can teach you.

Photo via iStock.

15. Rest before you are tired.

Even if you love your job and every day seems like a holiday, you need to take time to rest. You’re a human and not an android; never forget that.

16. Don't judge.

Just because people make different choices than you, they are not stupid. Also, you don’t know everything about people, so don’t judge them — help them.

17. Think about others.

Just be mindful, that’s all. We all have families, bills to pay, and our own issues. Don’t always make everything about yourself.

18. Give without expecting something in return.

Don’t keep score. You will become a bitter person if you do that. Give solely for the joy of giving. If you get something in return, great, and if you don’t, great.

19. There's no end game.

We, as a species, just are. Don’t try to figure it all out. Enjoy your journey.

20. Enjoy small things.

I like clichés because they are (usually) true. Especially this one. You know why? Everyone says they know it, but no one lives up to it. They just chase big things.

Photo via iStock.

21. Don't take yourself so seriously.

Yeah, yeah, you’re an individual, and people have to take you seriously. I get it. But at the end of the day, we’re all a bunch of ants trying to chase the same things. Lighten up.

22. Don't blame people.

What’s the point? Do you want to punish them? Also don’t blame yourself — you’re only human.

23. Create something.

Not to leave a legacy (you won’t be here to see it anyway), but to be of use. Make music, write a book, build a table, anything. You’ll feel good about yourself, plus you give something back to people to use or enjoy.

24. Never look back for too long.

Reflecting on the past is only good for one thing: learning.

25. Take action.

Don’t just sit there; do something. Without action, there is no outcome.

Photo via iStock.

You might know a lot. But like Socrates, you and I also know nothing at all. So we have to keep learning.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

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True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

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