In 2018, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences got much larger — and more diverse.

The Oscar-granting organization sent out 928 invitations (a jump from the previous year's 774) to actors, screenwriters, and executives that have shown dedication and exceptional work in the film industry. Those invitations set out make the organization more female, more ethnically diverse, and more international.

928 is a huge number, but we've listed some familiar faces that are joining the esteemed body below:


1. Gina Rodriguez ("Annihilation," "Deepwater Horizon")

Photo by Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images.

An outspoken defender of women's rights, immigration reform, and the importance of diversity in film, Rodriguez publicly accepted the award with glee.

2. Jada Pinkett Smith ("Girls Trip," "Set It Off")

Photo by Robin Marchant/Getty Images for SiriusXM.

As one of the first actresses to call out the Oscars' diversity problem, Pinkett Smith's decadeslong work is finally getting some well-deserved recognition.

3. Mindy Kaling ("Ocean's Eight," "A Wrinkle in Time")

Photo by Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images.

4. Tiffany Haddish ("Girls Trip," "Keanu")

Photo by Emma McIntyre Getty Images for MTV.

5. Kumail Nanjiani ("The Big Sick," "Hello, My Name Is Doris")

Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images for Women in Film.

Nanjiani's public recollection of falling in love with the woman who would become his wife during her life-threatening sickness warmed the hearts of romantics around the world. A vibrant defender of equal rights and the importance of diversity in film, Nanjiani is sure to add some necessary perspective to the Academy.

6. Danai Gurira ("Black Panther," "Mother of George")

Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images.

7. Quvenzhané Wallis ("Annie," "Beasts of the Southern Wild")

Photo by Leon Bennett/Getty Images for Essence.

At just 14 years old, Wallis is the youngest member of this year's Academy cohort.

8. Sarah Silverman ("Battle of the Sexes," "Wreck-It Ralph")

Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images.

9. Wendell Pierce ("Selma," "Horrible Bosses")

Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images.

Pierce may be one of the hardest working men in Hollywood and on the ground. As a hilarious and thoughtful advocate of community engagement and diversity in film, he's a welcome addition.

10. Trevante Rhodes ("12 Strong," "Moonlight")

Photo by Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for GLAAD.

"Moonlight" warmed the hearts of many Americans, in large part thanks to Rhodes' brilliant depiction of black gay manhood.

11. Christine Baranski ("Miss Sloane," "Mamma Mia!")

Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions.

12. Hannibal Buress ("Blockers," "Spider-Man: Homecoming")

Photo by Jerritt Clark/Getty Images.

13. Taye Diggs ("Rent," "Chicago")

Photo by Lars Niki/Getty Images for Gotham Magazine.

It's clear that there are few things that Diggs can't do. Now, he can add being on the Academy to that list.

14. Ken Jeong ("Crazy Rich Asians," "The Hangover")

Photo by Amanda Edwards/Getty Images.

15. Joy Bryant ("Bobby," "Get Rich or Die Tryin'")

Photo by  Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images.

16. Kendrick Lamar ("Black Panther," "Divergent")

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for NARAS.

Lamar also won a Pulitzer in 2018 for his rap genius. Enough said.

17. J.K. Rowling ("Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," "Harry Potter")

Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

Humanitarian. Writer. Bringer of joy to millions of children and adults for decades. Rowling is the epitome of using one's talents in spite of setbacks to make the world a better place. Her voice in the Academy will make waves.

18. Amy Schumer ("I Feel Pretty," "Trainwreck")

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images.

Schumer isn't one to back down from a challenge. She's a hard worker, a fighter, and an important voice in feminist film.

19. Regina Hall ("Girls Trip," "Scary Movie")

Photo by Earl Gibson III/Getty Images.

Hall's recognition is long overdue, but it's awesome that it's finally here.

20. Derek Luke ("Miracle at St. Anna," "Antwone Fisher")

Photo by Greg Doherty/Getty Images.

21. Daniel Kaluuya ("Black Panther," "Get Out")

Photo by Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Huffington Post.

A breakout star of 2017, Kaluuya's rise in film has been fast, powerful, and extremely important.

22. Rashida Jones ("Celeste and Jesse Forever," "The Social Network")

Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

23. Kal Penn ("The Namesake," "Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle")

Photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images.

24. Randall Park ("Ant-Man and the Wasp," "Snatched")

Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images.

25. Mía Maestro ("The Motorcycle Diaries," "Frida")

Photo by Mike Windle/Getty Images for LACMA.

Maestro's genius were evident in "Frida" and many other films. This acknowledgement is extremely well deserved.

And that's just 25 of them.

This year, the Academy is more Asian, Latino, black, female, and queer, representing the wide array of experiences around the world. Our film industry will be better for it, and so will the audiences that tune in.

Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy asked his Senate colleagues the questions millions of Americans have after a mass shooting.

Another school shooting. Another mass murder of innocent children. They were elementary school kids this time. There were 18 children killed—so far—this time.

The fact that I can say "this time" is enraging, but that's the routine nature of mass shootings in the U.S. It happened in Texas this time. At least three adults were killed this time. The shooter was a teenager this time.

The details this time may be different than the last time and the time before that, and the time before that, and the time before that. But there's one thing all mass shootings have in common. No, it's not mental illness. It's not racism or misogyny or religious extremism. It's not bad parenting or violent video games or lack of religion.

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Meet Eva, the hero dog who risked her life saving her owner from a mountain lion

Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva when a mountain lion suddenly appeared.

Photo by Didssph on Unsplash

A sweet face and fierce loyalty: Belgian Malinois defends owner.

The Belgian Malinois is a special breed of dog. It's highly intelligent, extremely athletic and needs a ton of interaction. While these attributes make the Belgian Malinois the perfect dog for police and military work, they can be a bit of a handful as a typical pet.

As Belgian Malinois owner Erin Wilson jokingly told NPR, they’re basically "a German shepherd on steroids or crack or cocaine.”

It was her Malinois Eva’s natural drive, however, that ended up saving Wilson’s life.

According to a news release from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Wilson had been walking down a path with Eva slightly ahead of her when a mountain lion suddenly appeared and swiped Wilson across the left shoulder. She quickly yelled Eva’s name and the dog’s instincts kicked in immediately. Eva rushed in to defend her owner.

It wasn’t long, though, before the mountain lion won the upper hand, much to Wilson’s horror.

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