via Vic / Flickr

In the never-ending quest for equality of the sexes, female issues have become a major focus in society.

Ending the gender wage gap, stopping sexual assault, encouraging female participation in STEM, and projecting more positive imagery of women in the media have all been important issues that have received growing attention over the past few years.

However, at the same time, there are important issues men are facing that haven't been getting the attention they deserve. A big part of that is society's attempt to correct generations of oppression faced by women. While, at the same time, men suffer in silence because they're socialized to internalize their problems and emotions.


Here are a few of the issues men face that should get more attention:

In 2017, men died by suicide 3.54x more often than women.

Men are more than ten times more likely to die in the workplace than a woman.

Video game addiction is becoming a serious problem for men.

Men are falling behind women in college enrollment.

Men lose sole custody of their children in about 90% of custody cases.

RELATED: Kumail Nanjiani opened up about the work it took to get fit, because men also have impossible beauty standards

A Redditor named zeldarangerr reached out to the online forum and asked men out there "What sucks about being a guy?" and it was a great opportunity for men to open up about issues they aren't usually asked about.

The thread is also a great opportunity for women to better understand some of things that men go through that they rarely speak about.

In the thread men honestly discuss the difficulties they have being the instigator in romantic relationships. It's hard for a lot of guys to muster up the confience to ask a woman out on a date. It can be just as hard to attempt to hold a woman's hand or ask for a kiss.

They guys also revealed the day-to-day problems that come with having a penis and testicles. Why the hell is the most sensitive part of ourselves hanging outside of our bodies?

Here are some of the most revealing answers to the question: What sucks about being a guy?

Penis problems.




Being expected to make the first move.


The pressure to be a manly man.




Being stereotyped as sex-obsessed.



You're afraid people will think you're a creep.




Not being able to express your emotions.


Other dudes.



Nobody cares about you.



Testicles.








Photo by tom coe on Unsplash

UPDATE: Back in early June NYC reported zero coronavirus deaths, a number that unfortunately was updated as new information came in. This latest update appears to represent a more certain statistic. Even if there's an adjustment, it's clear that New York City has made an incredible evolution from the world's epicenter of the virus to one that has become America's shining light for paving a path forward to all other major cities and locales in how to combat this deadly disease.

According to Bloomberg News, NYC coronavirus deaths peaked at 799 in one day back on April 9th.

"New Yorkers have been the hero of this story, going above and beyond to keep each other safe," City Hall spokeswoman Avery Cohen said in a statement emailed to Bloomberg..

Original story begins below:

New York State reported five deaths statewide on Sunday but didn't specify where those fatalities occurred. The highest number of deaths statewide was reported on April 9, at 799.

New York City has reported a total of 18,670 confirmed Covid-19 deaths and 4,613 probable ones.On Wednesday, for the first time since early March, New York City logged its first day with zero confirmed deaths from COVID-19. For a city that became the nation's biggest coronavirus hotspot by far, with a daily peak of 590 deaths on April 7, that's wonderful news.

There is one caveat, though. According to the New York Daily News, records released by the city showed three "probable" deaths from the virus, which may very well end up being confirmed. Even at that, though, the milestone of zero confirmed deaths in a 24-hour period was met with celebration by officials in the city, which has seen nearly 17,000 confirmed deaths and more than 4,700 probable deaths in the past three months.

Keep Reading Show less