What do you call someone who leaves gallon jugs all over the desert? A hero.

"When I was hungry, did you feed me? When I was thirsty, did you give me a drink?"

It's a heartbreaking story:

5-year-old Marco Antonio Villaseñor's father was desperately in search of economic opportunity and a better life. That need compelled him to take Marco on a trek, with nearly 20 other men, across the desert into the United States.

One day, somewhere along the journey, Marco became thirsty. He asked his father for a drink of water but received no answer. So he asked one of the other men. Again, no answer. This same request went unanswered each time the little boy approached one of his fellow travelers. Why? Because they all, including Marco's father, had already died of thirst.


Marco was asking the dead for water.

Stories like this are the ones that Enrique Morones can never forget.

They give names and faces to a group of people often viewed as a nameless, faceless mass: undocumented immigrants. And it is stories like this (shared in the video by Misael Virgen below) that motivate Enrique every day in his work as the founder and executive director of the nonprofit Border Angels.

In 1996, after 10 years of assisting migrants who lived in the canyons of San Diego, Enrique and his Border Angels began going out into the Imperial Valley desert and leaving gallons of water with the hopes that those who pass through would find them on their journey.

It's a small offering, but since thousands of people have died along that very crossing, this single gesture of love and care can make a huge difference.

The work of Enrique's Border Angels there and in other areas along the U.S.-Mexico border is a reminder of the age-old principle "Do what you can with what you have."

While the national battle over immigration reform continues year after year, people like Enrique are doing something right now: saving lives, one gallon of water at a time.

Unfortunately, Marco's story didn't have a happy ending.

He too died of thirst on his journey. But thanks to Enrique and his Border Angels, many others won't have to.

Every day, they are making a difference in the lives of anyone who finds their life-giving water tucked under a mesquite tree, hidden from the blazing sun.

Watch the video to learn more about their mission:

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On an old episode of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in July 1992, Oprah put her audience through a social experiment that puts racism in a new light. Despite being nearly two decades old, it's as relevant today as ever.

She split the audience members into two groups based on their eye color. Those with brown eyes were given preferential treatment by getting to cut the line and given refreshments while they waited to be seated. Those with blue eyes were made to put on a green collar and wait in a crowd for two hours.

Staff were instructed to be extra polite to brown-eyed people and to discriminate against blue-eyed people. Her guest for that day's show was diversity expert Jane Elliott, who helped set up the experiment and played along, explaining that brown-eyed people were smarter than blue-eyed people.

Watch the video to see how this experiment plays out.

Oprah's Social Experiment on Her Audience www.youtube.com

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