What do Connie Britton's hair and women's equality have in common? Everything.

There are but a few guarantees in life.

The sun will rise. The sea will roar. And Connie Britton's hair will be fabulous.

Don't try to fight it. The "Nashville" and "Friday Night Lights" star boasts an impeccable head of hair. We mere mortals are powerless against it.


"Full eyes. Clear hearts. Can't achieve this look on my best day." Photo by Frazer Harrison/Getty Images.

But what's her secret? How does Connie Britton achieve her glamorous look? Feminism.

Yes, feminism.

All GIFs from The Representation Project.

In this tongue-in-cheek video, (written and directed by actress Laura Benanti), Britton shares just how feminism has helped her achieve the perfect look and a better life through legal protections and legislation, including:

And much, much more.

But be careful, Britton says. Feminism is not without consequences.

This wouldn't be a strong commercial without shots of shiny hair and warning labels, obviously.

Image by The Representation Project.

Britton and Benanti giggle and toss their hair ... while sharing a long list of feminism side effects, including "passage of the equal-rights amendment," "a culture where gender-based violence is considered unacceptable," and "a fair budget for women's reproductive health." Not to mention dry mouth.

The video was created by The Representation Project and their #AskHerMore campaign.

The Representation Project uses film and television to ditch limiting stereotypes and ignite social change.

Their #AskHerMore campaign is a push to encourage reporters to ask actresses more substantive questions on the red carpet than "Who are you wearing?" What's your workout routine?" and in Britton's case, "How do you get those beachy waves?"

Reese Witherspoon advocated #AskHerMore before the Oscars in February. Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images.

The campaign began last fall at the 2014 Emmys and continued at the Oscars and Grammys. Using the hashtag #AskHerMore, fans, reporters, and even stars like Reese Witherspoon and Lena Dunham chimed in to offer their own suggestions for questions and messages of support.



Even Upworthy joined in with a signal boost.


This razor-sharp short kickstarts #AskHerMore's fall campaign, launching just in time for the 67th Annual Emmy Awards, airing Sunday, Sept. 20.

Catch all the laughs, shiny hair, and fierce advocacy in Britton's one-minute video.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message β€” 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again β€” and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.