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Time magazine's new cover is a chilling representation of Trump's border policy.

Trump may have signed an executive order, but the crisis he created is far from over.

Time magazine's new cover is a chilling representation of Trump's border policy.

The cover of Time magazine's new issue is horrifying — and, sadly, justified.

An edited image of Trump stands on the right side and gazes down, expressionless, at a terrorized migrant girl, whose photo went viral after her mother was stopped at the U.S.-Mexico border earlier this week.

"Welcome to America," the chilling cover reads.

The cover poses a sincere question to every reader: What kind of country are we?

It's a question many Americans are wrestling with.


After facing intense backlash for enforcing a "zero tolerance" border policy, the president signed an executive order to end the humanitarian crisis his administration created. The policy, deemed unnecessarily cruel to a wide majority of Americans, separated children — including toddlers and infants — from their migrant parents at America's southern border. Children were placed in facilities many have compared to prisons and internment camps. Many were placed into cages.

Photo by John Moore/Getty Images.

Now, thousands of children have been left separated from their parents. And, at the time of publication, the Trump administration has no coherent plans to reunite the families it tore apart.

These families are desperate asylum seekers fleeing violence in Central America — including the mother of the small child on Time's new cover.

The teary-eyed girl in pink is a 2-year-old from Honduras who's experienced a heartbreaking amount of trauma.

Photo by John Moore/Getty Images.

"The mother told me they had been traveling for a full month and were exhausted," says photographer John Moore, who captured the photo for Getty. "They were taken into custody with a group of about 20 immigrants, mostly women and children, at about 11 p.m."

The girl and her mother were stopped near the Rio Grande River in Texas. They'd traveled 1,500 miles in an attempt to find safety in America.

"I took only a few photographs and was almost overcome with emotion myself," Moore said of the experience.

"Then, very quickly, they were in the van, and I stopped to take a few deep breaths."

Photo by John Moore/Getty Images.

While Trump caved to political pressures and ended his policy separating families, the larger story is just beginning.

These kids — and their parents — desperately need our help. They need to be reunited, and they need the financial help to do it.

Learn more about ways you can help asylum-seeking families like this one.

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This year more than ever, many families are anticipating an empty dinner table. Shawn Kaplan lived this experience when his father passed away, leaving his mother who struggled to provide food for her two children. Shawn is now a dedicated volunteer and donor with Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle Tennessee and encourages everyone to give back this holiday season with Amazon.

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Over one million people in Tennessee are at risk of hunger every day. And since the outbreak of COVID-19, Second Harvest has seen a 50% increase in need for their services. That's why Amazon is Delivering Smiles and giving back this holiday season by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Second Harvest to feed those hit the hardest this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local food bank or charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your selected charity.

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Americans are more interested in politics than ever these days. More voted in the 2020 election than in any other in the past 100 years. Over 65% of the voting-eligible cast a ballot in the contentious fight between Joe Biden and Donald Trump.

"People are very excited and paying attention even though there are all this bad news and high 'wrong track' numbers in the country," Nancy Zdunkewicz, managing editor at Democracy Corps, told The Hill.

It's wonderful to see that a greater number of Americans are standing up to be counted and demanding their voices be heard. But it's also the symptom of a deep level of discontent many people feel about their country.

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A lot of people here are like family to me," Michelle says about Bread for the City — a community nonprofit located in Washington DC that provides local residents with food, clothing, health care, social advocacy, and legal services. And since the pandemic began, the need to support organizations like Bread for the City is greater than ever, which is why Amazon is Delivering Smiles to local charities across the country this holiday season.

Watch the full story:

Amazon is giving back by fulfilling hundreds of AmazonSmile Charity Lists, and donating essential pantry and food items to help organizations like Bread for the City provide to those disproportionately impacted this year.

Visit AmazonSmile Charity Lists to donate directly to a local charity in your community, or simply shop smile.amazon.com and Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to your charity of choice.
via Richard Desmick / TikTok

Over the weekend, an estimated thousands of people ran 2.23 miles to show their support for Ahmaud Arbery, a former high school football player and avid jogger. Arbery was shot and killed in February near Brunswick, Georgia after being pursued in a truck by a former policeman and his son who claimed he resembled someone responsible for break-ins in the neighborhood.

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The U.S. Surgeon General credits the new surge in COVID cases to "pandemic fatigue," but it's nothing compared to what healthcare workers on the frontlines are going through. TIME recently reported that nurses are experiencing burnout, but it often goes unseen. A nurse recently employed a social media trend to draw attention to the behind the scenes fatigue.

An ICU nurse posted her own "how it started/how it's going" photo on Twitter, and long story short, it's not going that great. The before photo of Kathryn, an ICU nurse in Nashville, was taken in the middle of April right after she completed nursing school. The after photo revealed just how much literal sweat and tears healthcare workers put in while treating people during the pandemic.


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