Mom's funny viral video nails what it's really like taking our kids to the playground

Is there anything more lovely on a nice day than seeing families playing at the park? Kids being away from screens and the house, getting their energies out on the playground is a beautiful sight indeed. Such joy. Such innocence.

But when you're the mom with the kids at the playground, the reality has a slightly different feel.

Don't get me wrong. Taking kids to the playground is awesome in many, many ways. Kids love to play and having a place for them to run and climb and slide and swing is fabulous. But the playground is sneaky. The fact that the kids are outside and occupied sort of fools you into thinking you can take a bit of a break from the relentlessness of parenting, but oh ho ho no. That's simply not a thing.


Parenting at the playground is just a different level of parenting. With the wee ones, you can't take your eyes off them for a second, lest they wander toward the road or into a duck pond or away with another family whose snacks look yummier than yours. With the slightly older ones, they won't let you take your eyes off them for a second, with a constant stream of, "Look at this! Watch this! Watch me do this!" Adorable? Yes. But also a little much when Mommy is tired and was hoping for a little respite.

Mom and viral video maven Tiffany Jenkins highlights these truths and more in her hilarious reenactment of park day parenting. The video has been viewed more than 7 million times, and it's not hard to see why. No one does the "everymom" better than Tiffany Jenkins, and she is definitely the everymom here.

Presenting "Taking my kids to the playground be like" with the subtitle "Thing I say at the friggin playground." Enjoy:

How accurate is that? From the multiple potty requests to the smelling of the sad flowers to the , she truly captures the funny reality of being an exhausted mom taking kids to the park. And if you're someone who struggles with any form of social anxiety, you probably also appreciated the eye contact panic.

Going to the playground isn't necessarily the fun and games it appears to be. We know it's good for kids' social, mental, emotional, and physical well-being. We know this. But it's basically like taking all the normal parenting stuff and transferring it to an outdoor space with random strangers, other kids, and bathrooms where you don't want your kids to touch anything. (It is infinitely better if you can meet another mom friend at the park. That's 100% the way to go if you must go.)

If you found this video entertaining, I highly suggest checking out Tiffany Jenkins' other videos. She not only tackles parenting with humor and wit, but she also digs into mental health issues in a way that's relatable and real while also being hilarious. In addition, she speaks about addiction as a person in recovery and provides a welcoming community for everyone dealing with any of these issues. She's kind of impossible not to adore. You can find and follow her on Facebook at Juggling the Jenkins.

Aging is a weird thing. We all do it—we truly have no choice in the matter. It's literally how time and living things work.

But boy, do we make the process all kinds of complicated. The anti-aging market has created a 58.5 billion-dollar industry, with human beings spending their whole lives getting older spending buttloads of money to pretend like it's not happening.

I'm one of those human beings, by the way, so no judgment here. When I find a product that makes me look as young as I feel inside, I get pretty giddy.

But there's no doubt that our views on aging—and by extension, our perspectives on our own aging bodies—are influenced by popular culture. As we see celebrities in the spotlight who seem to be ageless, we enviously tag them with the hashtag #aginggoals. The goal is to "age well," which ultimately means looking like we're not aging at all. And so we break out the creams and the serums and the microdermabrasion and the injections—even the scalpel, in some cases—to keep the wrinkles, crinkles, bags, and sags at bay.

There's a big, blurry line between having a healthy skincare routine and demonizing normal signs of aging, and we each decide where our own line gets drawn.

This is where Justine Bateman comes in.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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