This wacky rock star says he's running for president. 28 reasons that's actually awesome.

When it's time to politically party, Andrew W.K. will always party hard.

You might recognize Andrew Wilkes-Krier as That Crazy Long-Haired Rocker Guy who sang that "Party Hard" song. Which is accurate. But in addition to his delightfully positive pop-metal anthems about partying and his fist-pumping DJ gigs, Andrew W.K. is a renowned motivational speaker, children's television host, advice columnist for the Village Voice, and an all-around unstoppable force of positive energy.

Also he has a pizza guitar.


Photo by Mireya Acierto/Getty Images.

But on top of all of that, Andrew W.K. says he is running for president of the United States with his new political party: The Party Party.

"The Party Party is simple in its mission: To free the American people from the dysfunction that is our two party system," Andrew W.K. said in a video announcing his candidacy.

"Most people have become too caught up in the bickering of our news cycles to realize that we ultimately desire the exact same things: reliable access to education, healthcare, and a sense of social equality. If enough people are willing to liberate themselves from choosing left or right, a third voice can emerge with a much more powerful message. [...] If we open our hearts and approach the problems we face with an open mind, real change can be achieved."

This might sound ridiculous coming from a guy who only wears white T-shirts and white jeans, but these 28 tweets show what we could expect from President Andrew W.K.'s Party Party.

Photo by Mireya Acierto/Getty Images.

1. He believes in gender equality.


2. He believes in love, not hate.


3. He plays nice and encourages others to do the same.

4. He believes in the First Amendment.


5. He has a very strong stance on national defense.


6. And he refuses to provoke other countries that we might not get along with.

7. He has an excellent track record on human rights.

8. He is concerned about mental health.

9. He believes in empathy and understands the need to help those who are struggling in the way they want to be helped.


10. He knows that things aren't always perfect, and that's OK.


11. While he supports our capitalist economy, he also understands the dangers of unchecked greed.


12. He is a patriot who believes in American ingenuity, domestic trade, and personal responsibility.


13. He loves animals.


14. He supports NASA and space exploration, as well as geological and ecological sciences.


15. He cares about hygiene. And respect.

16. He supports marriage equality.


17. He has excellent manners, which gives him an advantage in dealing with international relations and diplomacy.

18. Banana manners.

19. He believes in protecting endangered species, such as the unicorn.

20. He respects and values women.

21. He has a strong foreign policy and refuses to give in to xenophobia.

22. He really likes animals.

23. He's your friend! He's everyone's friend! He's a guy you like and get along with!


24. He understands the need for employment and educational opportunities.


25. He believes in climate change.

26. He gives hugs.


27. He believes in the American dream.


28. He won't give up on the American people.

Does this look un-serious to you? Photo by Scott Gries/Getty Images.

Is he kidding? Is this ridiculous? Is this all a big joke? Maybe. But he does claim to be in the process of filing the proper paperwork, so who knows?

Regardless of whether the Party Party is real or not, it has a LOT of people talking about some important issues.

W.K. is right: There are a lot of problems with our two-party system, and a lot of people are feeling disillusioned and disenfranchised by our current political atmosphere. We all want similar things, and yet we continue to let ourselves get bogged down in the same rhetoric and the same us-versus-them mentality, and we keep voting in the same candidates who continue to hurt us just because their names are the ones on the ballots.


While Andrew W.K. probably won't become our next president, there’s still a lot to be learned by studying the things he stands for, regardless of how wacky and over-the-top they might seem on the surface.

Then again, maybe we shouldn't count him out just yet — after all, there's that other seemingly-absurd celebrity presidential candidate who has made a lot of headway with his anti-establishment rhetoric. But his idea of a "party" probably has less to do with self-empowerment and mutual respect.

Here's the full video announcing Andrew W.K.'s presidential candidacy.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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The mission is personal for Talarico, as he nearly died three years ago when he was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

He shared his story on Twitter:

"In May 2018, I was a healthy 28-year-old running for the Texas House. I decided to walk the entire length of my district and hold town halls along the way. I hike Big Bend every year, so I wasn't concerned about a 25 mile walk...

But halfway through the walk, I began feeling nauseous and fatigued. Before the town hall in Hutto, I vomited in the bathroom."

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less