This heartwarming ad from Apple may be the most adorable video you see all day.

Prepare yourself, because a new ad campaign from the marketing wizards at Apple may leave you a sniffling mess.

The four short spots for Apple in Australia briefly capture the weddings and first dances of real same-sex couples. The ads are all set to a Courtney Barnett cover of the INXS hit, “Never Tear Us Apart.”

Like any good first dance, there are are spins …


All GIFs via Apple Australia/YouTube.

… grins …

… confetti ...

... and kisses.

It's the perfect lovey-dovey, super sweet, "I’m not crying. You’re crying" kind of commercials we all love to watch.

So why the happy tears? Because for couples in Australia, a video like this was a long-time coming.

In November, 2017 Australians completed a national postal survey, essentially an unofficial vote, on whether they approved a change to the law to allow same sex couples to wed. 61.6% of respondents said "I do," clearing a path for an official vote in parliament in December, where marriage equality passed almost unanimously.

“We’ve voted today for equality, for love, it’s time for more marriages, more commitment, more love, more respect,” Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull told the country's House of Representatives. “This is Australia: fair, diverse, loving, and filled with respect.”

People in the crowd celebrate as the survey result is announced. Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images.

While marriage equality is not the first and last priority for LGBTQ people, normalizing same-sex couples and families is no small thing.

After all, the U.S. has had marriage equality since 2015 and still:

Representation and visibility alone won't solve these problems.

But seeing and celebrating our similarities and shared humanity is just what we need to gain passionate allies in the fight for equality. This isn't a battle for special rights or treatment — it's a simple request for dignity, respect, and economic empowerment.

And if we get one step closer because of films, TV, shows, books, or even a commercial shot on an iPhone, so be it.

Grab the tissue and check out the 60 second ad “First Dance.”

Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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via Jimivr / Flickr and Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Actress Billie Lourd paid tribute to her late mother Carrie Fisher on Tuesday by sharing a photo of her son Kingston watching Fisher as Princess Leia in 1977's "Star Wars: A New Hope."

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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