This heartwarming ad from Apple may be the most adorable video you see all day.

Prepare yourself, because a new ad campaign from the marketing wizards at Apple may leave you a sniffling mess.

The four short spots for Apple in Australia briefly capture the weddings and first dances of real same-sex couples. The ads are all set to a Courtney Barnett cover of the INXS hit, “Never Tear Us Apart.”

Like any good first dance, there are are spins …


All GIFs via Apple Australia/YouTube.

… grins …

… confetti ...

... and kisses.

It's the perfect lovey-dovey, super sweet, "I’m not crying. You’re crying" kind of commercials we all love to watch.

So why the happy tears? Because for couples in Australia, a video like this was a long-time coming.

In November, 2017 Australians completed a national postal survey, essentially an unofficial vote, on whether they approved a change to the law to allow same sex couples to wed. 61.6% of respondents said "I do," clearing a path for an official vote in parliament in December, where marriage equality passed almost unanimously.

“We’ve voted today for equality, for love, it’s time for more marriages, more commitment, more love, more respect,” Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull told the country's House of Representatives. “This is Australia: fair, diverse, loving, and filled with respect.”

People in the crowd celebrate as the survey result is announced. Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images.

While marriage equality is not the first and last priority for LGBTQ people, normalizing same-sex couples and families is no small thing.

After all, the U.S. has had marriage equality since 2015 and still:

Representation and visibility alone won't solve these problems.

But seeing and celebrating our similarities and shared humanity is just what we need to gain passionate allies in the fight for equality. This isn't a battle for special rights or treatment — it's a simple request for dignity, respect, and economic empowerment.

And if we get one step closer because of films, TV, shows, books, or even a commercial shot on an iPhone, so be it.

Grab the tissue and check out the 60 second ad “First Dance.”

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