This heartwarming ad from Apple may be the most adorable video you see all day.

Prepare yourself, because a new ad campaign from the marketing wizards at Apple may leave you a sniffling mess.

The four short spots for Apple in Australia briefly capture the weddings and first dances of real same-sex couples. The ads are all set to a Courtney Barnett cover of the INXS hit, “Never Tear Us Apart.”

Like any good first dance, there are are spins …


All GIFs via Apple Australia/YouTube.

… grins …

… confetti ...

... and kisses.

It's the perfect lovey-dovey, super sweet, "I’m not crying. You’re crying" kind of commercials we all love to watch.

So why the happy tears? Because for couples in Australia, a video like this was a long-time coming.

In November, 2017 Australians completed a national postal survey, essentially an unofficial vote, on whether they approved a change to the law to allow same sex couples to wed. 61.6% of respondents said "I do," clearing a path for an official vote in parliament in December, where marriage equality passed almost unanimously.

“We’ve voted today for equality, for love, it’s time for more marriages, more commitment, more love, more respect,” Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull told the country's House of Representatives. “This is Australia: fair, diverse, loving, and filled with respect.”

People in the crowd celebrate as the survey result is announced. Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images.

While marriage equality is not the first and last priority for LGBTQ people, normalizing same-sex couples and families is no small thing.

After all, the U.S. has had marriage equality since 2015 and still:

Representation and visibility alone won't solve these problems.

But seeing and celebrating our similarities and shared humanity is just what we need to gain passionate allies in the fight for equality. This isn't a battle for special rights or treatment — it's a simple request for dignity, respect, and economic empowerment.

And if we get one step closer because of films, TV, shows, books, or even a commercial shot on an iPhone, so be it.

Grab the tissue and check out the 60 second ad “First Dance.”

Photo by Brian Wertheim on Unsplash

Politics has always been a mixed bag of genuine discussions about governance, inane partisan bickering, and ongoing struggles for power. As much as I wish we could engage in the first more often, it feels like politics in America has become far more of the latter.

Within those partisan power struggles, the language of politics gets skewed and molded to fit specific purposes. Sometimes, phrases are used as dog whistles calling on people's prejudices. Far too often, the manipulation of words and their meanings—political rhetoric—renders certain terms meaningless as they get tossed around without nuance or context. Ultimately, the repeated use of certain terminology ends up destroying discourse instead of adding to it.

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but here are 10 terms I'd love to see us flush from American political discussions:

1. "Real Americans"

There's no excuse for anyone ever using this term. To call certain people "real Americans" implies some kind of defining characteristic that some Americans have and some don't, which is the complete opposite of the country's diverse reality. And who would get to determine that definition, anyway? Do we go by majority? A full 82% of Americans live in urban areas. Does that mean city people are "real Americans" and the rural minority are not? Obviously, that's ludicrous—just as ludicrous as the idea that Americans in diners talking about the Bible are "real Americans." There's simply no such thing.

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After years of service as a military nurse in the naval Marine Corps, Los Angeles, California-resident Rhonda Jackson became one of the 37,000 retired veterans in the U.S. who are currently experiencing homelessness — roughly eight percent of the entire homeless population.

"I was living in a one-bedroom apartment with no heat for two years," Jackson said. "The Department of Veterans Affairs was doing everything they could to help but I was not in a good situation."

One day in 2019, Jackson felt a sudden sense of hope for a better living arrangement when she caught wind of the ongoing construction of Veteran's Village in Carson, California — a 51-unit affordable housing development with one, two and three-bedroom apartments and supportive services to residents through a partnership with U.S.VETS.

Her feelings of hope quickly blossomed into a vision for her future when she learned that Veteran's Village was taking applications for residents to move in later that year after construction was complete.

"I was entered into a lottery and I just said to myself, 'Okay, this is going to work out,'" Jackson said. "The next thing I knew, I had won the lottery — in more ways than one."

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via wakaflockafloccar / TikTok

It's amazing to consider just how quickly the world has changed over the past 11 months. If you were to have told someone in February 2020 that the entire country would be on some form of lockdown, nearly everyone would be wearing a mask, and half a million people were going to die due to a virus, no one would have believed you.

Yet, here we are.

PPE masks were the last thing on Leah Holland of Georgetown, Kentucky's mind on March 4, 2020, when she got a tattoo inspired by the words of a close friend.

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When your party and its leader are plagued by accusations that they support white supremacists, it's probably best to avoid staging large events with symbols reminiscent of those used by the Third Reich.

The Republican Party failed to do that at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) last weekend. Instead, the main stage at the event was in the shape of the othala rune, a symbol used interchangeably with the swastika in Nazi Germany.

The conference was held at the Hyatt Regency in Orlando, Florida.

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