They start by ripping his life's work to shreds. Then the guy with the ponytail steps forward.

This segment of "Shark Tank" will probably give chills.

"Shark Tank" is a hit show on ABC.

Five investors (or "sharks" ... get it?) listen to entrepreneurs who need some cash to grow their business.

If the "shark" likes an idea, they pony up some cash. And in return, they get a piece of the entrepreneur's business.


Most of the time, the people who win the shark's money are the ones willing to:

1. Cut the costs of manufacturing,

2. Outsource their product overseas, or

3. Raise their price or cut corners.

Eat or be eaten. These guys are brutal, especially this dude:

I mean, come on, dude.

But not Barbara. #justsayin

Barbara's cool. She always treats people with respect, she loves helping women, and she watches out for the underdog. (If you're reading this, Barbara, I love you!)

Anyway.

Not long ago, this farmer guy, Johnny Georges, walked off the fields...

...and into the tank.


Johnny invented *THE* why-did-I-not-think-of-that idea of the year: an irrigation "T-Pee" for trees.

It's a simple little plastic teepee-shaped device you place over a tree trunk. It conserves water. Like, A LOT of water. Farmers use about 25,000 gallons of water on each tree during its lifetime. This device reduces that to 800 gallons! BONUS: These plastic guys protect trees from frost — frost that would kill most trees.

PLUS, each tree gets a teepee. Got a lotta trees on your farm? You're gonna need a lotta teepees! Helloooo, Mr. Profit!

Johnny sells his device to farmers and makes about $1 profit.

He knows he can't charge a lot of money because non-gigantor farms (think mom-and-pop) simply can't afford to pay more.

One of the sharks (guess which one) debated with Johnny about his price being too cheap. This dude wanted to triple the price to immediately scale distribution, thus making the product available primarily to giant corporate farms ... leaving family farms in the DUST.


Johnny's product saves water, helps save the earth, and saves money for small farmers. It could change the world and create a new industry.

But Mr. $12 T-Pee sees money. He doesn't see people.

Not Johnny.

Johnny did not budge. He wants to help PEOPLE.

Neither did the shark. He wants to help the bottom line of HUGE corporations.


Johnny grew up working hard. He knows what farmers can afford. And it's not $12 apiece.

I'm not saying that corporations shouldn't be able to buy stuff, or that sales shouldn't earn a reasonable profit. But what's happening here is someone looking at the human bottom line AND the corporate bottom line. Johnny thought it was more important to make a reasonable profit and save TWO precious resources (water AND family farms) rather than throw them both away.

One of the sharks swam in a different direction.

JEALOUS?

Ponytail guy (or American billionaire, John Paul Jones DeJoria) gave him everything he asked for.

What do you think? Would you rather put your money behind a LOT of humans or a handful of corporations?

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