They start by ripping his life's work to shreds. Then the guy with the ponytail steps forward.

"Shark Tank" is a hit show on ABC.

Five investors (or "sharks" ... get it?) listen to entrepreneurs who need some cash to grow their business.

If the "shark" likes an idea, they pony up some cash. And in return, they get a piece of the entrepreneur's business.


Most of the time, the people who win the shark's money are the ones willing to:

1. Cut the costs of manufacturing,

2. Outsource their product overseas, or

3. Raise their price or cut corners.

Eat or be eaten. These guys are brutal, especially this dude:

I mean, come on, dude.

But not Barbara. #justsayin

Barbara's cool. She always treats people with respect, she loves helping women, and she watches out for the underdog. (If you're reading this, Barbara, I love you!)

Anyway.

Not long ago, this farmer guy, Johnny Georges, walked off the fields...

...and into the tank.


Johnny invented *THE* why-did-I-not-think-of-that idea of the year: an irrigation "T-Pee" for trees.

It's a simple little plastic teepee-shaped device you place over a tree trunk. It conserves water. Like, A LOT of water. Farmers use about 25,000 gallons of water on each tree during its lifetime. This device reduces that to 800 gallons! BONUS: These plastic guys protect trees from frost — frost that would kill most trees.

PLUS, each tree gets a teepee. Got a lotta trees on your farm? You're gonna need a lotta teepees! Helloooo, Mr. Profit!

Johnny sells his device to farmers and makes about $1 profit.

He knows he can't charge a lot of money because non-gigantor farms (think mom-and-pop) simply can't afford to pay more.

One of the sharks (guess which one) debated with Johnny about his price being too cheap. This dude wanted to triple the price to immediately scale distribution, thus making the product available primarily to giant corporate farms ... leaving family farms in the DUST.


Johnny's product saves water, helps save the earth, and saves money for small farmers. It could change the world and create a new industry.

But Mr. $12 T-Pee sees money. He doesn't see people.

Not Johnny.

Johnny did not budge. He wants to help PEOPLE.

Neither did the shark. He wants to help the bottom line of HUGE corporations.


Johnny grew up working hard. He knows what farmers can afford. And it's not $12 apiece.

I'm not saying that corporations shouldn't be able to buy stuff, or that sales shouldn't earn a reasonable profit. But what's happening here is someone looking at the human bottom line AND the corporate bottom line. Johnny thought it was more important to make a reasonable profit and save TWO precious resources (water AND family farms) rather than throw them both away.

One of the sharks swam in a different direction.

JEALOUS?

Ponytail guy (or American billionaire, John Paul Jones DeJoria) gave him everything he asked for.

What do you think? Would you rather put your money behind a LOT of humans or a handful of corporations?

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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