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Spoiler alert: America is already great.

In response to the tactics used by the current party in power, many groups and organizations have assembled to fight the "alternative fact" that America isn't great already.

One of those groups is the Creative Action Network, founded by Max Slavkin and Aaron Perry-Zucker, and their message is simple and powerful:

"Creative Action Network is a global community of artists and designers, making art with purpose. We run crowdsourced campaignsaround causes. Anyone and everyone is welcome to contribute their own original, visual, meaningful work. We then develop those designs into print, apparel, and other products, and sell them here in our online store and through our retail partners, supporting artists and causes with every purchase."

One of their current campaigns is "What Makes America Great." It perfectly encapsulates, visually, what we're all thinking.

We spoke to Slavkin, a former Upworthy employee, about Creative Action Network's plan to release 100 posters by 100 artists over the first 100 days of the Trump presidency, while raising money for DreamCorps, a social justice accelerator created by former (Obama) White House advisor Van Jones.

The benefit, as Slavkin explains, is two-fold, "On a more tactical level, we hope to raise some money for DreamCorps, and on a deeper level, we truly hope to shift a lot of people's mindset from fear and anxiety to one of more hope and celebration."

Amazing artists have taken part in this campaign, including Juana Medina, who is illustrating the latest project by the current U.S. Poet Laureate.

DreamCorps is ecstatic to be part of this.

A statement from Jeremy Hays, chief engagement officer for DreamCorps, said in part: "Art is the soul of the movement. Art and artists help us connect our heads with our hearts in order to see with new perspective our struggles, possibilities, and strength. We are proud to participate in this campaign and to share this art with the thousands of people who make up America’s #LoveArmy."

Over 3,000 organizations have mobilized since inauguration, and they're doing incredible work. Creative Action Network is proof there is a place for compassion, hope, and celebration.

This is a movement full of art, fundraising, activism, and most importantly, a celebration of what already makes America great.

For more information, visit the Creative Action Network.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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