The Inuit people have been living in the frozen tundra of northern Canada for thousands of years, so they clearly are the experts on creating warm outdoor wear. Canada Goose, a company that makes highly-rated outerwear, knows something about marketing warm jackets to people in cold climates.

What if you combined the best of both worlds to create a whole new kind of coat?

Project Atigi has set out to do just that. Established in 2019, Project Atigi is a social entrepreneurship program that "celebrates the expertise and the rich heritage of craftsmanship that has enabled Inuit to live in some of the most formidable climates and conditions," according to a press release.

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Facebook / Cierra Brittany Forney

Children in middle school can be super shallow when it comes to fashion. To be part of the in-crowd, you have to wear the right shoes and brand-name clothing, and listen to the right music.

The sad thing is that kids that age can be so creative, but they're forced into conformity by their peers.

Some people never escape this developmental phase and spend their entire lives wasting their money on material goods and judging those who do not or can not.

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Over the past several years, artist Benjamin Von Wong has been on an amazing journey inspiring people to reconsider what they throw away.

It started with a trip to Guatemala and an up-close photoshoot of a massive trash heap there, and quickly morphed into a series of projects designed to confront people with various aspects of the world's waste problem.

As an artist, however, he wanted to do it in a way that would get people to look first before he unloaded harrowing facts about waste on them. There's so much alarmist news out there about what we're doing to our planet that, frankly, after a while, many of us end up turning off to the problem. Von Wong's method of turning trash into something beautiful to get our attention is a different, perhaps more productive approach.

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For mom Sharon Choksi, clothes shopping with her daughter had become a nightmare.

Her then 4-year-old daughter, Maya, had some pretty specific ideas about what she was comfortable wearing: nothing too frilly, nothing with bows, NO sparkles. Short shorts and tight fits were a big no-no, but the clothes couldn't be too baggy or boxy either.

Finding clothes that fit the bill was exhausting (most of the time they ended up buying from the boys' section) but it wasn't her daughter that Choksi was upset with. It was clothing retailers themselves.

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