Many of us would argue Amy Schumer is a straight-up goddess.

I mean, what's not to love about this woman?


Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images.

She's funny, damn-near fearless, and loves to tell it like it is.

As far as humans go, Schumer is pretty divine.

Photo by Mark Sagliocco/Getty Images.

One Instagram user, however, recently noted how much Schumer actually does resemble a well-known mythological figure.

And the internet overwhelmingly agreed.

Whitney Davis, a student at the University of West Georgia, shared a side-by-side image of Schumer and a statue of Aphrodite on Instagram. The famed photo of Schumer, taken by Annie Leibovitz, had already been praised as an authentic celebration of body positivity and self-love. But its similarity to the Greek mythological figure — the goddess of love and beauty — shines a whole new light on its message.

A photo posted by Whitney (@whitneyzombie) on


In the photo's caption, Davis wrote (emphasis mine):

On the left is a sculpture of the goddess Aphrodite, who is renowned for her beauty. On the right is @amyschumer. What a wonderful resemblance between two beautiful women. So many women and young girls are shamed by the media and fashion industry for not having a flat stomach and not being a size zero. But look, the goddess of beauty is portrayed here with stomach rolls and doesn't have a perfectly smooth, toned body. I want to remind everyone that they do not have to be a Victoria's Secret model to be a beautiful goddess with a beautiful body. Your body is not bad, ugly, or wrong. Embrace your inner goddess. #bodypositive #amyschumer #everybodyisagoodbody #Aphrodite

The pic has certainly resonated with users, as the post has garnered more than 28,000 Likes and hundreds of (mostly positive) comments throughout the week.

"I am absolutely amazed by the attention the picture has gotten," Davis told Upworthy of her viral post, noting that — although some commenters have misconstrued the image's message — "the greatest thing about it is seeing so many people saying the picture helped them in some way."

Schumer herself caught wind of the viral comparison and threw in her two cents.


Schumer has been a vocal advocate for body positivity during her rise to stardom in recent years.

When she's not batting down internet trolls mocking her bikini body or standing up for women of all sizes, Schumer's praising magazines for not airbrushing her covers and sharing personal stories of triumph over drunk college guys and chauvinistic radio DJs.

She's a body positivity boss and nothing less.

Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Peabody Awards.

"I am a woman with thoughts and questions and shit to say," Schumer noted in an awards speech in 2014. "I say if I'm beautiful. I say if I'm strong. You will not determine my story — I will."

Sounds like goddess material to me.

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