+
More

The head of the Coast Guard wrote a must-read letter to servicemembers about the government shutdown.

The head of the Coast Guard wrote a must-read letter to servicemembers about the government shutdown.

In the midst of the longest government shutdown in American history, it can be difficult to keep track of who is affected and exactly how they are affected.

But this one letter from the head of the U.S. Coast Guard does a better job that just about any other symbolic example of showing how a partial shutdown supposedly centered on American border security is literally hitting home the hardest for the people who have signed up to protect America from outside threats.

Admiral Karl Schultz is the 26th Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard and was forced to issue a letter to those serving their country that for the first known time on record they would not be receiving paychecks for their work. On Twitter, Schultz summarized the news with a thunderously simple message:


“Today you will not be receiving your regularly scheduled paycheck. To the best of my knowledge, this marks the first time in our Nation’s history that servicemembers in a U.S. Armed Force have not been paid during a lapse in appropriations.”

In a series of follow-up tweets, Schultz continued to outline how the members of the USCG are continuing to serve and protect America’s interests even if the American government, primarily because of President Trump, can’t hold up its end of serving our country.

The letter reads in full:

To the Men and Women of the United States Coast Guard, Today you will not be receiving your regularly scheduled mid-month paycheck. To the best of my knowledge, this marks the first time in our Nation’s history that servicemembers in a U.S. Armed Force have not been paid during a lapse in government appropriations.

Your senior leadership, including Secretary Nielsen, remains fully engaged and we will maintain a steady flow of communications to keep you updated on developments. I recognize the anxiety and uncertainty this situation places on you and your family, and we are working closely with service organizations on your behalf. To this end, I am encouraged to share that Coast Guard Mutual Assistance (CGMA) has received a $15 million donation from USAA to support our people in need. In partnership with CGMA, the American Red Cross will assist in the distribution of these funds to our military and civilian workforce requiring assistance.

I am grateful for the outpouring of support across the country, particularly in local communities, for our men and women. It is a direct reflection of the American public’s sentiment towards their United States Coast Guard; they recognize the sacrifice that you and your family make in service to your country. It is also not lost on me that our dedicated civilians are already adjusting to a missed paycheck—we are confronting this challenge together. The strength of our Service has, and always will be, our people. You have proven time and again the ability to rise above adversity. Stay the course, stand the watch, and serve with pride. You are not, and will not, be forgotten.

Semper Paratus, Admiral Karl L. Schultz Commandant
via Tod Perry

An artist's recreation of Jackie's napkin note.

A woman named Jackie pulled a move straight out of a romantic comedy recently, and it has the internet rallying around her potential love interest. Jackie met a guy at a bar and liked him so much that she gave him her phone number. Well, 80% of her number, that is.

The world heard about it on January 17 when Twitter user Henpecked Hal and shared a picture of the napkin with her partial phone number written on it. "My 22-year-old cousin met his dream girl at a bar and it's going pretty well,” Hal wrote in the tweet.

Keep ReadingShow less
Photo by Jackie Cook/MyLondon Photography Contest.

Many locks of bright, pink hair peek around the corner of the stairwell.

This article originally appeared on 08.17.16


A group of 105 homeless people gathered at St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

Each of them was given a disposable camera and told to take pictures that represent "my London."

The photos were entered in an annual contest run by London-based nonprofit Cafe Art, which gives homeless artists the chance to have their work displayed around the city and, for some of the photographers who participate in the yearly challenge, in a print calendar.

Keep ReadingShow less
Courtesy of Molly Simonson Lee

Flight attendant sits on floor to comfort passenger

Not everyone enjoys flying. The level of non-enjoyment can range from mild discomfort to full blown Aerophobia, which is defined as an extreme fear of flying. While flying is the quickest way to get to far away destinations, for some people being that far off the ground is terrifying and they'd rather take their chances on the ground.

A passenger flying from Charlotte-Douglas International Airport in North Carolina to JFK International Airport in New York confronted that fear while flying with Delta. The woman, who is currently still unidentified expressed that she was nervous to fly according to Molly Simonson Lee, a passenger seated behind the woman who witnessed the encounter. Tight spaces don't make for much privacy, but in this case, the world is better for knowing this took place.

Keep ReadingShow less
More

Maybe you missed the 11 priceless photos a new mom took of her napping baby.

She decided to put her photography skills and her daughter's sleeping skills together to create some adorable works of art.

Image created from Burst

Mom is finding time to still be creative.

This article originally appeared on 09.14.16


When Laura Izumikawa was pregnant with her daughter, Joey, her friends who had kids warned her life as she knew it would change once Joey was born.

In some ways, this was true. After Joey was born, Laura's stress levels rose, and her "me time" diminished significantly.

Keep ReadingShow less
Identity

Kids' minds are blown in a PSA designed to change the idea that jobs are tied to gender.

Teachers asked kids to draw a firefighter, a surgeon, and a pilot, then surprised them with the real deal.

Photo from YouTube video

A campaign pushes back against limitation and gender roles.

This article originally appeared on 09.01.16


When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? A firefighter? A rockstar? What about a veterinarian or a fighter pilot?

While you were dreaming up your future career, did the fact that it typically attracts workers of a certain gender influence you at all? You might be quick to say "no way," but gender stereotypes likely played a part in your development even if you weren't aware of it.

Keep ReadingShow less
via Wait But Why and used with permission

The ten types of friends

This article originally appeared on 03.11.16


This post was originally published on Wait But Why.

When you're a kid, or in high school or college, you usually don't work too hard on your friend situations. Friends just kind of happen.

For a bunch of years, you're in a certain life your parents chose for you, and so are other people, and none of you have that much on your plates, so friendships inevitably form. Then in college, you're in the perfect friend-making environment, one that hits all three ingredients sociologists consider necessary for close friendships to develop: “proximity; repeated, unplanned interactions; and a setting that encourages people to let their guard down and confide in each other." More friendships happen.

Keep ReadingShow less