The Chicago Cubs World Series win is the election distraction America needs.

It had been 108 years since the Chicago Cubs won the World Series — the longest championship drought not just in baseball, but in all of U.S. pro sports.

On Wednesday night, the team defeated the Cleveland Indians in Game 7 of the World Series, becoming champions for the first time since Roosevelt was president (Teddy, not Franklin).

The Cubs celebrate their first World Series in 108 years. Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images.


As a whole, the series — which saw Cleveland jump ahead to a three-games-to-one advantage before Chicago came back to win three in a row — was an edge-of-your-seat thrill ride.

It was also exactly what America needs right now.

Cubs fans celebrate outside Wrigley Field in Chicago. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images.

This year's presidential election has been brutal, seemingly endless, and inescapable. The World Series was the perfect distraction from it all.

Odds are that if you're planning on casting a ballot on Nov. 8, you already know who you're going to vote for. At this point, no amount of talk of which candidates sent what emails or who grabs women where is likely to persuade you. Still, the next several days will be full of these messages, perhaps even more intense than ever before.

Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images.

It's exhausting, it's anxiety-inducing, and it's stressful.

Short of turning off your TV, unplugging your computer, avoiding newspapers, and logging out of your social media accounts, there's not much you can do to escape it. That's why life's little joys — even something as simple as a baseball game — are so needed right now. Sure, it's temporary relief, but it's meaningful.

Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo celebrates a run in the fourth inning. Photo by Elsa/Getty Images.

Joy helps us navigate the world in trying times. It doesn't erase the bad, but it provides needed balance.

"At its best, sports provides a glimpse of us at our best — fair competition among companions for glory of something larger than ourselves," tweeted Ana Marie Cox, a journalist who has been covering the presidential campaign for MTV. "But even the greatest moments in sports don't undo or cancel out or counter us at our worst. And there's a lot of worst going around [right now]."

Just a day earlier, Cox published a heartfelt message about how this year's campaign — and more specifically, the prospect of a Donald Trump presidency — led her to question her religious faith. In trying times, there's nothing wrong with escaping into a world of temporary joy. Joy gives us relief. Joy gives us perspective.

Actor and Cubs fan Bill Murray reacts on the field after the Chicago Cubs won Game 7. Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images.

Even if you're not a Cubs fan, a baseball fan, or even a sports fan — this joy is for you, too.

We've earned it. We've all earned it. We shouldn't need to be made to feel perpetually anxious, and if reveling in a baseball game helps break that cycle, that's wonderful.

Maybe your joy comes from something else, like a favorite movie, a book, or a song. If that's the case, try to take a moment sometime in these next few days to let yourself experience what it is that brings you joy. You've earned it.

Find your joy, whatever it may be.

All the Way

Today is our day. #FlyTheW

Posted by Chicago Cubs on Thursday, November 3, 2016
Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less

Some cats have it all. Seriously.

For some cat owners, their furry friends are equal to (or in some cases, greater than) humans, and they have the digs to prove it.

Take, for instance, the adorable little bedroom Twitter user @CinnamonBear9 shared with the world this week. Kitty has a bed, complete with bedspread that matches mom's and dad's. He has pictures on the walls, a rug, a miniature chair, some tiny yarn balls, and a mini scratching post. And the pièce de résistance? A wooden wall frame that holds a tablet so the cat can watch bird videos on YouTube.

Keep Reading Show less
Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less