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ellen degeneres

Health

Teenager creates eye-opening videos that shatter stereotypes surrounding autism and girls

"I get that a lot, that because I'm good-looking, nothing can be wrong with me — so I want to show that mental illness is diverse."

via paigelayle / Instagram

The most recent data shows that about one in 68 children in the U.S. are affected by autism and boys are four times more likely than girls to be diagnosed.

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is marked by communication and social difficulties, sensory processing issues, and inflexible patterns of behavior. Almost everything that researchers have learned about the disorder is based on data derived from studies of boys.

However, researchers are starting to learn that ASD manifests differently in girls. This has led many girls to be undiagnosed or misdiagnosed.


"The model that we have for a classic autism diagnosis has really turned out to be a male model," Susan F. Epstein, PhD, a clinical neuropsychologist said according to Child Mind.

"That's not to say that girls don't ever fit it, but girls tend to have a quieter presentation, with not necessarily as much of the repetitive and restricted behavior, or it shows up in a different way," Epstein added.

Stereotypical ASD behaviors may also get in the way of recognizing the disorder in girls.

"So where the boys are looking at train schedules, girls might have excessive interest in horses or unicorns, which is not unexpected for girls," Dr. Epstein notes. "But the level of the interest might be missed and the level of oddity can be a little more damped down. It's not quite as obvious to an untrained eye."

Girls with ASD are usually better at hiding their autistic behaviors, so they suffer in silence.

Paige Layle, a 19-year-old eyelash technician from Ontario, Canada, has autism but because she's a social butterfly, most people don't realize she has the disorder.

"I get that a lot, that because I'm good-looking, nothing can be wrong with me — so I want to show that mental illness is diverse," Layle told BuzzFeed.

To help people better understand how autism manifests in girls and women, Layle has made a series of videos on her TikTok page.

"I decided to start making videos because of an audio that was going all over TikTok that was making fun of autistic people. I hated it. I feel like many people don't understand how many people are autistic," she said.

Layle's videos are eye-opening because they shatter some big myths about autism and show how difficult it can be to live with the disorder, especially if you don't know you have it.

@paigelayle learn more about autism! :) i get many questions every day to make more vids about it, i will continue to show you guys! #feature #fup #fyp #featureme ♬ original sound - paigelayle

In the first video, she explains how the initial research done on autism was only on boys or men.

"Girls usually end up showing different traits than guys do. Which is why it can take us years to get diagnosed. I was 15 when I got diagnosed and that's considered early for a girl."

She also explains that girls often are diagnosed later because they are better at hiding autistic behaviors.

"This is something we call masking. Masking is basically just being like a really good actor.

It's where you take traits that everyone else is showing and start portraying them as yourself. It's like a lot of copying going on. ... In your mind you don't think you're copying. You think that this is normal and everyone feels the same way you do.


You basically feel like an alien and you're really good at hiding that. Which is why I don't seem autistic."

In part two, she discusses the idea of being high-functioning.

@paigelayle no such thing as high/ low functioning autism!!! it’s just how YOU perceive us. not about how we’re affected. #feature #featureme #fup #fyp ♬ original sound - paigelayle

"Get high-functioning and low functioning out of your vocabulary. It doesn't help anybody. I know you may think that saying 'Oh like you're high-functioning' is compliment. It's not a compliment. It's also like a reminder that I'm just masking, and it's so hard.

Masking is the most exhausting thing in the world... 'High-functioning' is basically a label that you can use to be like 'Your autism doesn't affect me that much.' But I'll tell you that everyone you think is high-functioning is greatly affected by their autism."

In part three, Paige discusses common autistic traits that girls have.

@paigelayle more on special interests later ☺️ #feature #autism #fyp #fyp #featureme ♬ original sound - paigelayle

"I am overly social. I give way too much eye contact. I'm really good in social situations. It's also very common for girls with autism to have other mental disabilities or mental disorders as well. I have seven and one of the main ones is OCD.

All of these mental illnesses stem from having autism. But OCD, anxiety, and depression are very common, especially in girls. Just the feeling that the world needs rules for you to understand it. That's why a lot of autism special interests include things like anatomy, the human body, psychology, just figuring out how the world works is our way to figure out how to live in it."

In part four, Paige discusses the topic of masking.

@paigelayle ahhh masking. can’t live with you, can’t live without you. #feature #fup #fyp #featureme #autism ♬ original sound - paigelayle

"When you're in the autistic closet and you are not known to be autistic yet ... you like subconsciously know that you're weird and you don't know how to act or how to be.

It's like the way you walk, the way you talk, the way you wear your hair, like your mannerisms. Like everything you say. Everything you think. Everything you think that you enjoy. It's all what you are accustomed to from your peers.

I've been diagnosed for four years and I'm still trying to figure out who I am and what I actually like to do. You just get to used to creating this mask that when it's like 'Hey, you can take it off,' It's like what the frick is underneath it? I don't know what's going on."


This story originally appeared on 03.11.20

Massimo Mandato transforms into Dolly Parton.

It’s always amazing to see a great impressionist, such as Frank Calliendo or Melissa Villaseñor, put on another persona for comedic effect. There is something magical about people who can uncover a person’s mannerisms and essence and replicate them for comedic effect.

It’s one of the oldest forms of comedy, but when done right, it’s still as entertaining as ever.

Massimo Mandato, a 24-year-old Canadian TikTokker, has devised a new way of impersonating people simply by making a face and striking a pose. The incredible thing is that, for some reason, he has the ability to look like different people, regardless of their gender or age. The magnificent thing is he can pull off their look in just a few seconds, and once you see it, you can't unsee the resemblance.


"It's the way that I literally look like everyone," he opens his first video in the series. "Don't believe me? Buckle up." What is it about this man’s face that makes it a blank slate that can transform into just about anyone?

Let’s take a look at some of his fabulous work.

In this video, he shows us that he looks like Kendall from “Dance Moms,” Elvis Presley, Sam Smith, Gru (from “Despicable Me”) as a kid, Shane Dawson and YouTuber Dream. How in the world can he look like all those people when they don’t even look like each other?

Commenter Camille Roe asked the same thing: "None of these people look similar, but somehow you look just like every one of them.”

@massmandato

tell me who else I look like☠️ #shanedawson #samsmith #dream #gru #elvis #fyp #greenscreen

After the video went viral, the commenters began asking him to do impressions of some more people they think he looks like. That led to a follow-up where he poses his face to look like Elizabeth Moss from “Mad Men,” Emma Chamberlain, Dina from "Superstore," Ellen DeGeneres, Napoleon Bonaparte and Tobey Maguire.

[Video 2]

@massmandato

Wait till the end I was shook☠️ #emmachamberlain #tobeymaguire #ellen

Again, Napoleon looks nothing like Ellen, and Tobey Maguire looks nothing like Peggy, the copywriter from “Mad Men,” so how does he look like all 4? The commenters were blown away by Mandato’s resemblance to the French emperor.

"Why are you literally Napoleon?" Vee asked in the comments. “Napoleon had me dead," Karolastrona added. "When you zoomed out and Napoleon appeared, my eyes popped out of my head," Michelle Lee wrote.

In this video, Mandato looks like Katy Perry, Paris Jackson, Lorde, Balloony from "Phineas and Ferb," JoJo Siwa, British racing driver George Russell, and Lenny from “Shark Tale.”

@massmandato

The list just keeps increasing😫#jojosiwa #georgerussell #lorde #greenscreen @JoJo Siwa @

Last, but not least, here's Mandato as Dolly Parton.

@massmandato

Literally how😭 #dollyparton

Even though impressionists have been working throughout human history, technology has opened up a new way for these artists to show off their craft.

Mandato isn’t just great because he poses like the people he’s impersonating. The videos flawlessly morph into a picture of the person, which is why the illusion works so well. Without TikTok, it’d be a little hard for Mandato to pull off his act. It would be interesting to see how he would present his unique talent in a live stage show.

Image pulled from YouTube video.

Magic shines on "The Ellen Show."

NBA legend and entrepreneur Magic Johnson has so much love for his son E.J., who came out in 2013.

In a 2017 appearance on "The Ellen Show", Johnson talked about the moment E.J. (a rising star in his own right) came out to to him and his wife, Cookie. They had what can only be described as the ideal reaction: They supported their son from the get-go.

"When my son came out, I was so happy for him and happy for us as parents," Johnson said. "And we love him. And E.J. is amazing."


Ellen asked what advice Johnson would give other parents who find themselves in the same situation. His advice was spot-on.

"I think it's all about you not trying to decide what your daughter or son should be, or what you want them to become," he answered. "It's all about loving them no matter who they are [or] what they decide to do."

Family acceptance and support is important to all kids, but it's vital for the health and well-being of LGBTQ youth.

"You gotta support your child," Johnson wants parents to know. "It's so many people who try to discriminate against them, so they need you to support them. 'Cause if you don't support 'em, who's gonna support 'em and love 'em?"

family, gender rights, community, social norms

Magic talks about his son E.J. on "The Ellen Show."

Image pulled from YouTube video.


There's enough bigotry and discrimination in the world. No child deserves to hear it at home.

The data doesn't lie: "LGBT young people whose parents and caregivers reject them or try to change them are at high risk for depression, substance abuse, suicide and HIV infection," said Caitlin Ryan, faculty member at San Francisco State University and director of the Family Acceptance Project. "LGBT young people whose parents support them and stand up for them show much higher levels of self-esteem and greater well-being, with lower rates of health and mental health problems."

If you're a parent or family member supporting someone who just came out, you don't have to go it alone.

Check out PFLAG for more information, including local meet-ups for parents and resources to build and foster safe communities. Groups like Parents for Transgender Equality, the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), and Believe Out Loud are also great places to start.

Need more inspiration? See more of Magic Johnson's appearance on "Ellen."

This article originally appeared on 04.19.17


via Heather Roney / Facebook

Some of the most striking images of the COVID-19 pandemic have been the photographs of healthcare workers whose faces have been bruised and cut from wearing protective surgical masks.

This photo of a healthcare professional in Italy battling the pandemic was seen around the world. She looks like she went 12 rounds in the ring with a heavyweight fighter.



However, this type of pain isn't just a concern for the medical community. In high-foot-traffic professions such as grocery stores, people have been wearing masks for their entire shifts.

Now, it's recommended that all Americans wear protective masks when they go out in public.

A hospital in Canada put out a call to anyone who could help alleviate the pain caused by the masks and Quinn Callander, a Boy Scout, answered the request in a big way.

He got to work designing an ear guard that can be produced with his 3-D printer. It's a simple, but genius design. The guards connect the straps from the masks, elevating them to the back of the head, so they don't rub the backs of the ears. They're also adjustable so they fit comfortably.

Quinn's mother shared photos of his invention on Facebook and the post has gone viral, attracting over 340,000 shares.

"Quinn answered a request from the local hospitals for help with creating more 'ear guards' to help take the pressure off health care workers ears from wearing masks all day," his mother wrote on Facebook. "He got busy on his 3D printer and has been turning out dozens of ear guards to donate."


via Heather Roney / Facebook

"As someone who works in healthcare I can say that this is fantastic! When we wear them constantly all day everyday, they actually start to cut into the back of our ears," one Facebook user wrote.

Quinn has made the 3-D printing files for the project public, so that the ear guard can be replicated by anyone with a printer.

"In one week I've personally produced over 1300 straps, 1215 have gone to a few hospitals in my region where they seem to be really appreciated," Quinn wrote on the file. "A volunteer group that I'm contributing to in the Vancouver BC area has delivered over 3300 straps including mine."

His mother later edited the viral Facebook post, adding the file information, to encourage other people to print the ear guards as well.

"We need more volunteers to fire up their 3D printers and donate these ear guards to hospitals and medical professionals!" she wrote.

Quinn's mask is a great example of how everyone is now deputized to help out in the fight against the virus. Even though he's only 13, he used his special skill set to contribute in the best way he knew possible.

We all have our own unique skills we can use to help others during the pandemic. What can you do?