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It's hard to think of someone who's made more out of less than Arnold Schwarzenegger.

The 69-year-old actor, philanthropist, bodybuilder, and former governor of California was born in a house with no plumbing in Austria — a country was plagued by food shortages at the time.

Photo by Evening Standard/Getty Images.


Like all great people, though, Arnold didn't become successful by himself. He had help from teachers, mentors, and motivators — and he'll be the first to tell you so.

Schwarzenegger shared a poignant note on Facebook dispelling the myth that he is an entirely "self-made man."

Written originally as the foreword to Tim Ferris' book "Tools of Titans," Schwarzenegger's post began by explaining that whenever someone calls him a "self-made man," he gives thanks for the compliment but rejects the notion:

"It is true that I grew up in Austria without plumbing. It is true that I moved to America alone with just a gym bag. And it is true that I worked as a bricklayer and invested in real estate to become a millionaire before I ever swung the sword in Conan the Barbarian."

He thanked the people in his life who helped him achieve his dreams, saying he "stood on the shoulders of giants" to get there.

"But it is not true that I am self-made. Like everyone, to get to where I am, I stood on the shoulders of giants. My life was built on a foundation of parents, coaches, and teachers; of kind souls who lent couches or gym back rooms where I could sleep; of mentors who shared wisdom and advice; of idols who motivated me from the pages of magazines (and, as my life grew, from personal interaction)."

Photo by Kevin Lee/Getty Images for Paramount Pictures International.

Arnold went on to describe some of the most meaningful interactions he's had with the people who helped him get to where he is today.

From seeing bodybuilder Reg Park on a magazine cover and hearing about how he transitioned to a career in acting to Joe Weider coaching Schwarzenegger through his first years in America.

He thanked iconic actress Lucille Ball, who gave Schwarzenegger his first break in Hollywood. He also shared his gratitude for people like Nelson Mandela, Ronald Reagan, Muhammad Ali, and Andy Warhol, who he counts among his personal influences and heroes.

Finally, Schwarzenegger wrote, he owes his political career to the 4.2 million Californians who elected him governor in 2003.

Photo by David McNew/Getty Images.

"So how can I ever claim to be self-made?" Schwarzenegger asked in his note. "To accept that mantle discounts every person and every piece of advice that got me here. And it gives the wrong impression — that you can do it alone."

Schwarzenegger's message is a powerful reminder that being entirely self-made is nothing more than a myth. Everyone who achieves success had help from someone else, and how they show that gratitude can speak volumes about their character.

Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images.

Schwarzenegger didn't achieve success by himself — because no one can. We all have to lean on each other and offer our help to others when they need it.

As Schwarzenegger wrote, "whether it’s a morning routine, or a philosophy or training tip, or just motivation to get through your day, there isn’t a person on this planet who doesn’t benefit from a little outside help."

So next time someone you admire uses the phrase "self-made" to describe themselves, think of Schwarzenegger. Whoever you're talking to or about — a favorite actor, an entrepreneur, or even a president — remember that no matter what they say, they've had lots of help to get where they are. It's not about knocking them down — it's about recognizing that we're all in this together, and none of us can do it alone.

Joy

1991 blooper clip of Robin Williams and Elmo is a wholesome nugget of comedic genius

Robin Williams is still bringing smiles to faces after all these years.

Robin Williams and Elmo (Kevin Clash) bloopers.

The late Robin Williams could make picking out socks funny, so pairing him with the fuzzy red monster Elmo was bound to be pure wholesome gold. Honestly, how the puppeteer, Kevin Clash, didn’t completely break character and bust out laughing is a miracle. In this short outtake clip, you get to see Williams crack a few jokes in his signature style while Elmo tries desperately to keep it together.

Williams has been a household name since what seems like the beginning of time, and before his death in 2014, he would make frequent appearances on "Sesame Street." The late actor played so many roles that if you were ask 10 different people what their favorite was, you’d likely get 10 different answers. But for the kids who spent their childhoods watching PBS, they got to see him being silly with his favorite monsters and a giant yellow canary. At least I think Big Bird is a canary.

When he stopped by "Sesame Street" for the special “Big Bird's Birthday or Let Me Eat Cake” in 1991, he was there to show Elmo all of the wonderful things you could do with a stick. Williams turns the stick into a hockey stick and a baton before losing his composure and walking off camera. The entire time, Elmo looks enthralled … if puppets can look enthralled. He’s definitely paying attention before slumping over at the realization that Williams goofed a line. But the actor comes back to continue the scene before Elmo slinks down inside his box after getting Williams’ name wrong, which causes his human co-star to take his stick and leave.

The little blooper reel is so cute and pure that it makes you feel good for a few minutes. For an additional boost of serotonin, check out this other (perfectly executed) clip about conflict that Williams did with the two-headed monster. He certainly had a way of engaging his audience, so it makes sense that even after all of these years, he's still greatly missed.

Noe Hernandez and Maria Carrillo, the owners of Noel Barber Shop in Anaheim, California.

Jordyn Poulter was the youngest member of the U.S. women’s volleyball team, which took home the gold medal at the Tokyo Olympics last year. She was named the best setter at the Tokyo games and has been a member of the team since 2018.

Unfortunately, according to a report from ABC 7 News, her gold medal was stolen from her car in a parking garage in Anaheim, California, on May 25.

It was taken along with her passport, which she kept in her glove compartment. While storing a gold medal in your car probably isn’t the best idea, she did it to keep it by her side while fulfilling the hectic schedule of an Olympian.

"We live this crazy life of living so many different places. So many of us play overseas, then go home, then come out here and train,” Poulter said, according to ABC 7. "So I keep the medal on me (to show) friends and family I haven't seen in a while, or just people in the community who want to see the medal. Everyone feels connected to it when they meet an Olympian, and it's such a cool thing to share with people."

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Hold on, Frankie! Mama's coming!

How do you explain motherhood in a nutshell? Thanks to Cait Oakley, who stopped a preying bald eagle from capturing her pet goose as she breastfed her daughter, we have it summed up in one gloriously hilarious TikTok.

The now viral video shows the family’s pet goose, Frankie, frantically squawking as it gets dragged off the porch by a bald eagle—likely another mom taking care of her own kiddos.

Wearing nothing but her husband’s boxers while holding on to her newborn, Willow, Oakley dashes out of the house and successfully comes to Frankie's rescue while yelling “hey, hey hey!”

The video’s caption revealed that the Oakleys had already lost three chickens due to hungry birds of prey, so nothing was going to stop “Mama bear” from protecting “sweet Frankie.” Not even a breastfeeding session.

Oakley told TODAY Parents, “It was just a split second reaction ...There was nowhere to put Willow down at that point.” Sometimes being a mom means feeding your child and saving your pet all at the same time.

As for how she feels about running around topless in her underwear on camera, Oakley declared, “I could have been naked and I’m like, ‘whatever, I’m feeding my baby.’”

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