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What do you do with all the clothes you no longer wear?

Timeless as your wardrobe may be, chances are you'll eventually want to mix things up.


Sadly, even fluorescents get old. Image via iStock.

But when it's time for a closet refresh, a lot of us just toss our old gear in the garbage, where it's destined for an over-dressed hole in the ground.

An art installation unveiled on Seattle's Alki Beach will make you think twice before trashing your old clothes.

The striking piece was commissioned for an Earth Day event as part of Rethink Reuse, a campaign by thrift store chain Savers to get people thinking about their fashion footprints.

Check out their thought-provoking video, or scroll down for more:

Consumers are buying more clothes than ever before, and it's fueling a larger human crisis.

In North America alone, we send over 10 million tons of used clothing and textiles into landfills every year despite the fact that almost all of those items are reusable.

Photo by Gengiskanhg/Wikimedia Commons.

The clothing industry is one of the world's top polluters; "fast and cheap" fashion is costlier than it may seem.

The cost of new clothes isn't just what we see on price tags — it's also in the massive social and environmental debts we rack up by producing new clothes.

Image via Savers, used with permission.

Price tags tend to not account for a few key figures — such as the 713 gallons of water it takes to make a single t-shirt or the 70 million barrels of oil used to make just a year's worth of polyester. With the world consuming 80 billion new pieces of clothing each year, those external costs add up.

The most sustainable product is the one that already exists.

Shocking statistics like those were the inspiration for this project, which was brought to life with 3,000 pounds of discarded clothing.

And with a few empty oil barrels, two-by-fours, and chicken wire...

Image via Savers/YouTube.

...the installation was stopping beachgoers in their sandy tracks.

Image via Savers/YouTube.

Close to 1,500 people walked among the eye-catching sculptures, marveling at the creativity and learning about clothing waste and pollution (and thousands more viewed it online).

Image via Savers, used with permission.

"With the growing amount of clothing and textile waste ending up in landfills, we felt compelled to act," said Ken Alterman, president and CEO of Savers in a press release. "We want to help people better understand the environmental impact of their clothing waste and the steps they can take to reduce it."

Savers' goal was to spread one simple and actionable message: The environmental impact of the clothes we wear and throw away is massive, but there are simple things we can all do to help counteract it.

They're calling on consumers to reuse, donate pre-owned goods to its nonprofit partners, and recycle their old clothes instead of burying them in landfills where they're no good to anyone and to buy secondhand when possible.

With only 15% of our used clothing currently being donated or recycled, there's plenty of opportunity for all of us to create change.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People have clearly missed their free treats.

The COVID-19 pandemic had us waving a sad farewell to many of life’s modern conveniences. And where it certainly hasn’t been the worst loss, not having free samples at grocery stores has undoubtedly been a buzzkill. Sure, one can shop around without the enticing scent of hot, fresh artisan pizza cut into tiny slices or testing out the latest fancy ice cream … but is it as joyful? Not so much.

Trader Joe’s, famous for its prepandemic sampling stations, has recently brought the tradition back to life, and customers are practically dancing through the aisles.


On the big comeback weekend, people flocked to social media to share images and videos of their free treats, including festive Halloween cookies (because who doesn’t love TJ’s holiday themed items?) along with hopeful messages for the future.
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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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