Ryan Gosling put Costco on notice for breaking a big animal cruelty promise.

Ryan Gosling has a beef with Costco.

Gosling photo by Elen Nivrae/Flickr. Costco photo by Stu Pendousmat/Wikimedia Commons.


Here's what's going down.

Way back in 2007, Costco announced that starting ... one day, the company would sell only cage-free eggs.

Photo by Larry Rana/USDA.

As of June 2015, that day still hadn't arrived.

And it gets more frustrating: A Humane Society of the United States investigation found that one of Costco's major egg suppliers violated nearly ever standard of chicken decency, confining hens to tiny cages where they routinely injure themselves and are often forced to lay eggs, eat, and defecate on top of their dead cage-mates.

Needless to say, this pissed the notoriously righteous-hearted Gosling right off.

Gosling wrote Costco a letter. And pulled no punches.

"It is appalling that Costco has been selling these eggs with deceptive labeling on cartons featuring graphics of birds living out in a green pasture. You're already eliminating cages for veal calves and pigs – don't you feel that chickens also deserve the same mercy?"

And look, I love Costco. We all love Costco. Because Costco is great in a lot of ways.

Their average hourly wage for retail employees is $20/hour, which is astronomically far above the industry average. Plus, their whitefish salad is otherworldly good. (Trust me on this one. You won't regret it.)

Costco can still do better.

The Humane Society of the United States is urging consumers to call Costco and demand they speed their butts up and make the transition to cage-free immediately. 'Cause ... really. It's about time.

Chicken photo by Bodina/Wikimedia Commons.

Right on, Ryan Gosling.

Hopefully your heartfelt words spur some much-needed change.

Update (6/23/16) — In December 2015, Costco released a statement regarding its cage-free egg promise: "In calendar 2016 we expect to sell over one billion cage free eggs. We are working with our suppliers toward a complete and sustainable transition to a cage‐free supply chain. This transition, however, will take time because currently over 90% of the supply of eggs is from caged hens and because other retailers and restaurants are also moving to cage free requirements, placing greater demands on the limited supply."

Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

Screenshots via @castrowas95/Twitter

In the Pacific Northwest, orca sightings are a fairly common occurrence. Still, tourists and locals alike marvel when a pod of "sea pandas" swim by, whipping out their phones to capture some of nature's most beautiful and intelligent creatures in their natural habitat.

While orcas aren't a threat to humans, there's a reason they're called "killer whales." To their prey, which includes just about everything that swims except humans, they are terrifying apex predators who hunt in packs and will even coordinate to attack whales several times their own size.

So if you're a human alone on a little platform boat, and a sea lion that a group of orcas was eyeing for lunch jumps onto your boat, you might feel a little wary. Especially when those orcas don't just swim on by, but surround you head-on.

Watch exactly that scenario play out (language warning, if you've got wee ones you don't want f-bombed):

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