Richard Rose didn't believe in the 'hype' of wearing masks. Let's all learn from his tragedy.

By all accounts, Richard Rose was a good, fun and kind-hearted person. He served his country in the Army for nine years with two tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. The 37-year-old did not think wearing a mask was necessary, and will not be around to write the next chapter of his life. He passed away from coronavirus on July 4th.

Rose had been outspoken on social media about how he did not see the point of face coverings. Heavy.com confirmed that the posts were real. On April 28, he wrote: "Let make this clear. I'm not buying a f**king mask. I've made it this far from not buying into that damn hype."



Two months later, he visited a small village called Put-in-Bay on South Bass Island in Ohio. He posted a picture on Facebook that showed a crowded pool with no one wearing a mask and commented:"It's not packed lol." In a later Facebook post, Rose revealed that he probably contracted the virus during that time.

Rose started to feel symptoms in late June. On July 1st, he let his friends know that he was very sick and that he was suffering from symptoms of COVID-19."This morning I finally got swabbed," he said. "I should know soon what the results are. I just want to feel good again!" He let everyone know that he had not slept in two days due to breathing difficulties. Sadly, on the day that our country celebrates its independence, Rose was gone. He died in his home from complications related to the virus.

There was an outpouring of love on social media from those close to him. They spoke of what a fun and caring man he was. His friend Nick Conley shared his sentiments but also condemned people for making fun of his friend.

He told Cleveland 19, "Rick is getting slaughtered online right now for his decision that he made not to wear a mask and that's not right," Conley said. "We should still be compassionate whether we agree with someone's beliefs or not. Someone has passed away and we should have some compassion toward that."

Shame on the people who were saying "I told you so" on the page of a man now deceased. Richard Rose didn't believe that masks were necessary. I think we all know he would be in favor of masks now if he were still around to talk about it. And based on the accounts of those who loved him, we're guessing he'd speak out both for his own health and the people he might have infected. The man had a lapse in judgement. Do you know what else he had? Nine years serving our country. He loved and was loved by so many. Did he make a mistake? Yes. Should he be shamed for it now that he's dead? Absolutely not.

Whoever thought it was okay to do that should take a long hard look at how they live their own lives—really examine how cavalier and reckless those comments can be. They truly have no place in this world.


Conley hopes his friend's death will serve as a warning to others. He wrote on Facebook, "Rick was healthy as far as we know and was only in his 30's. Rick was like a lot of my friends, and didn't feel the need to wear a mask because he was young and healthy. Please know that this virus is real. Just because you don't personally know someone effected yet doesn't mean it's not real."

Truth is, the death of Richard Rose is an example of how real coronavirus is. COVID-19 kills people. When you don't wear a mask, you are putting yourself and everyone around you at risk. No one knows this better than Richard Rose III. If after all this, you still don't believe that masks are essential— and you think every doctor in the world has it wrong—take a long look at people like Richard who have lost their life. Please, wear a mask.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

In the autumn of 1939, Chiune Sugihara was sent to Lithuania to open the first Japanese consulate there. His job was to keep tabs on and gather information about Japan's ally, Germany. Meanwhile, in neighboring Poland, Nazi tanks had already begun to roll in, causing Jewish refugees to flee into the small country.

When the Soviet Union invaded Lithuania in June of 1940, scores of Jews flooded the Japanese consulate, seeking transit visas to be able to escape to a safety through Japan. Overwhelmed by the requests, Sugihara reached out to the foreign ministry in Tokyo for guidance and was told that no one without proper paperwork should be issued a visa—a limitation that would have ruled out nearly all of the refugees seeking his help.

Sugihara faced a life-changing choice. He could obey the government and leave the Jews in Lithuania to their fate, or he could disobey orders and face disgrace and the loss of his job, if not more severe punishments from his superiors.

According to the Jewish Virtual Library, Sugihara was fond of saying, "I may have to disobey my government, but if I don't, I would be disobeying God." Sugihara decided it was worth it to risk his livelihood and good standing with the Japanese government to give the Jews at his doorstep a fighting chance, so he started issuing Japanese transit visas to any refugee who needed one, regardless of their eligibility.

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