Proving you can kick butt at any age, Betty Soskin made a big career change — at 85 years old.

She does a job most people wouldn't expect a 93-year-old to do. She is the country's oldest park ranger.

And her tour is in high demand because of her unique perspective.

Five days a week, Betty Soskin gives tours of Rosie the Riveter World War II Home Front National Historical Park.


"I still love this uniform. Partly because there's a silent message to every little girl of color that I pass on the street or in an elevator or on an escalator who suddenly has it announced that there's a career choice she may not have ever thought of."
— Betty Soskin

Her life story is fascinating in itself. "The Today Show" did a short segment that made the interviewer cry:

At 27, her great-grandmother, a former slave, passed away. Betty worked through World War II as a clerk for a segregated union. And at age 85, she decided to become a park ranger for the Rosie the Riveter park. It didn't seem like a big deal to her because her mother lived until 101, her great-grandmother lived until 102, and her great-aunt lived to 107. They all stayed busy until their passing.

The stories she keeps alive through her tours are amazing, too.

Like the many talented, hard-working women whose contributions kept America going during World War II.

A former waitress building ships:

Eastine Cowner works as a scaler to construct the Liberty ship SS George Washington Carver launched on May 7, 1943. Public domain.

A mom doing her best to juggle her work role and her home role:

Midnight-shift shipyard worker Arlene Corbin brings her daughter to a day care facility before going home to sleep. Public domain.

Here's what Betty says about retiring:

Image by Jim Heaphy/Flickr (altered).

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Vanna White appeared on "The Price Is Right" in 1980.

Vanna White has been a household name in the United States for decades, which is kind of hilarious when you consider how she gained her fame and fortune. Since 1982, the former model and actress has made millions walking back and forth turning letters (and later simply touching them—yay technology) on the game show "Wheel of Fortune."

That's it. Walking back and forth in a pretty evening gown, flipping letters and clapping for contestants. More on that job in a minute…

As a member of Gen X, television game shows like "Wheel of Fortune" and "The Price is Right" send me straight back to my childhood. Watching this clip from 1980 of Vanna White competing on "The Price is Right" two years before she started turning letters on "Wheel of Fortune" is like stepping into a time machine. Bob Barker's voice, the theme music, the sound effects—I swear I'm home from school sick, lying on the ugly flowered couch with my mom checking my forehead and bringing me Tang.

This video has it all: the early '80s hairstyles, a fresh-faced Vanna White and Bob Barker's casual sexism that would never in a million years fly today.

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