People are sharing the biggest problem they have with their names
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A few days ago, Marcus Vance asked a great question on Twitter and it's gone viral because of the hilarious and infuriating responses: "What's the biggest problem you have with your name?

I can totally relate to anyone who is annoyed with their name because I'm Tod with one D. This means that I have to constantly answer the question, "Where did the other D go?" It also leads to not receiving emails and tweets because someone spelled my name wrong.


My dad thought it'd be cool to name me Tod with one D because Abraham Lincoln once told his wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, "If there's one D in God there should be one D in Todd."

It has also led to a subversive nickname some friends call me that makes some uncomfortable: "God."

I once walked into a crowded elevator and the operator, who I knew, greeted me with an enthusiastic "Hey God!" and everyone looked at me like I had two heads.

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Enough with my tale of woe. Here are some of the best responses to the question: "What's the biggest problem you have with your name?"


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Anne Hebert, a marketing writer living in Austin, TX, jokes that her closest friends think that her hobby is "low-key harassment for social good". She authors a website devoted entirely to People Doing Good Things. She's hosted a yearly canned food drive with up to 150 people stopping by to donate, resulting in hundreds of pounds of donations to take to the food bank for the past decade.

"I try to share info in a positive way that gives people hope and makes them aware of solutions or things they can do to try to make the world a little better," she said.

For now, she's encouraging people through a barrage of persistent, informative, and entertaining emails with one goal in mind: getting people to VOTE. The thing about emailing people and talking about politics, according to Hebert, is to catch their attention—which is how lice got involved.

"When my kids were in elementary school, I was class parent for a year, which meant I had to send the emails to the other parents. As I've learned over the years, a good intro will trick your audience into reading the rest of the email. In fact, another parent told me that my emails always stood out, especially the one that started: 'We need volunteers for the Valentine's Party...oh, and LICE.'"

Hebert isn't working with a specific organization. She is simply trying to motivate others to find ways to plug in to help get out the vote.

Photo by Phillip Goldsberry on Unsplash

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Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash
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