+
Oprah's powerful admission: She quit weighing herself because 'Healthy is the new skinny.'
via Entertainment Tonight / YouTube

There must be a hundred different ways to determine if someone is healthy. A general practitioner will check your lung capacity, blood pressure, heart rate, BMI, skin color, hair, eyes, and nails to see if you're healthy.

A psychiatrist will examine your mental and emotional states to see if you are healthy.

Our personal health is a complex thing, but many of us simply rely on a number on the scale to see if we're physically fit.

However, being thin doesn't necessarily mean someone is healthy.


While maintaining a healthy weight is important, when we don't hit our numbers on the scale it can lead to anxiety, depression, and low self- esteem — issues that can create serious health issues.

Oprah Winfrey knows a lot about the power the scale can hold over people. She has been candid about her weight throughout her career and, over the years, we've seen her body go through drastic changes.

while on her quest to find her ideal weight, it has fluctuated between 145 and 237 pounds.

RELATED: Reese Witherspoon had to 'prove' she was sexy enough to play Elle Woods in Legally Blonde

In a powerful interview with "Entertainment Tonight," Oprah admits that she's taken a more holistic view of her health and stopped worrying about the number on the scale.

"I'm really over the scale. I don't even use a scale anymore. I just use 'do I feel well and does this fit?'" she told the reporter.

"Because I now fully have come to understand — I'm about to turn 66 — I know having been on every diet in the world that now WW has allowed me to stabilize and to feel healthy inside and out with all the numbers that matter. Not just your weight but your blood pressure, your blood sugars and all of that.

"I'm healthier than I've ever been," she continued. "I do believe that healthy is actually the new skinny, Rachel. That is what I'm saying."

Oprah's words are important because of the tremendous influence she has over her fans. Oprah is letting them know that health is what's truly important and that's much more than the number on a scale.

RELATED: A teacher is going viral for giving a biology lesson wearing an anatomically correct suit

Later in the interview, she was asked what she's proud to have overcome.

"I'm especially proud of myself for not living in the world of comparisons," she admitted. "Years ago when I pulled out that wagon of fat, I was actually comparing myself to everybody else. Now I've reached the point where I'm really okay exactly where I am. It's taken me a lifetime, practically, to figure that out."

Imagine if everyone, Oprah included, learned at an early age that the only person we need to compare ourselves to is ourselves. It's not about trying to be like a celebrity on TV or our friends and family.

A truly happy life comes from trying to be a slightly better version of ourselves each and every day. That goes for our health, our careers, hobbies, and how we treat the people we love.





A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

Keep ReadingShow less
gerlalt/Canva

James Earl Jones helped "Sesame Street" prove its pedagogical model for teaching kids the alphabet.

James Earl Jones has one of the most recognizable voices in the entertainment industry and has for decades. Most of us probably heard that deep, resonant voice first as Darth Vader in "Star Wars," or perhaps Mufasa in "The Lion King," but just one or two words are enough to say, "Oh, that's definitely James Earl Jones."

Jones has been acting on stage and in film since the 1960s. He also has the distinction of being the first celebrity guest to be invited to "Sesame Street" during the show's debut season in 1969.

According to Muppet Wiki, clips of Jones counting to 10 and reciting the alphabet were included in unbroadcast pilot episodes and also included in one of the first official television episodes. Funnily enough, Jones originally didn't think the show would last, as he thought kids would be terrified of the muppets. Clearly, that turned out not to be the case.

Jones' alphabet recitation served as a test for the "Sesame Street" pedagogical model, which was meant to inspire interaction from kids rather than just passive absorption. Though to the untrained eye, Jones' slow recitation of the ABCs may seem either plodding or bizarrely hypnotic, there's a purpose to the way it's presented.

Keep ReadingShow less
via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


Keep ReadingShow less