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One sexual assault can affect a whole family for years. Just ask Lady Gaga.

Lady Gaga explained how a sexual assault may not have just one victim.

One sexual assault can affect a whole family for years. Just ask Lady Gaga.

Lady Gaga took the stage at the Producers Guild Awards on Jan. 23, 2016, to perform a song close to her heart.

The singer performed "Til It Happens to You" — a powerful ballad that describes the ensuing heartache that haunts a survivor of campus sexual assault. It's an especially personal tune for Gaga as she's a survivor herself.


Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for ABA.

Gaga used the spotlight on Saturday to share how one person's experience of sexual assault can alter the emotional health of an entire family.

"It's not only an important issue to me, but it's an important issue to my family," Gaga said from behind a piano on stage. She explained that her aunt was sexually assaulted when in college years ago, and the experience "tormented her so emotionally," it contributed to a decline in her physical health.

"My father was 16," Gaga explained of the timing of her aunt's death. "And it affected my family tremendously my whole life."

"Til It Happens to You" isn't just a powerful song. It's raising awareness and increasing visibility on the issue of sexual assault on campuses.

The song, which aims to help give survivors a voice, was featured in the critically acclaimed documentary "The Hunting Ground," which explores the overlooked crisis of sexual assault on college campuses.


"The statistics are staggering," the documentary's website explains, alluding to findings backed up by a recent study from the Association of American Universities. "One in five women in college are sexually assaulted, yet only a fraction of these crimes are reported, and even fewer result in punishment for the perpetrators."

Creating the Oscar-nominated song hasn't been the most carefree musical endeavor for Gaga. But that's never been the point.

Gaga, who's opened up in recent years about being sexually assaulted as a teenager, told the Los Angeles Times in December 2015 that listening to such a heart-wrenchingly personal song has been difficult. But finding courage with the support of loved ones is what the tune's all about — facing trauma head-on in order to heal.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for ABA.

"It was really hard for me when [the song] came out. I was really stressed out about it. Every time I listen to it, I cry," she said. "Every time I get a text about it, I always feel sick. It's like this thing you don't want to face. But because [songwriter Diane Warren] wanted to face it with me, it reminded me of what the song is for."

Watch the powerful music video for "Till It Happens to You" below (WARNING: The video contains graphic content that may be upsetting to some viewers):

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

via CNN / Twitter

Eviction seemed imminent for Dasha Kelly, 32, and her three young daughters Sharron, 8; Kia, 6; and Imani, 5, on Monday. The eviction moratorium expired over the weekend and it looked like there was no way for them to avoid becoming homeless.

The former Las Vegas card dealer lost her job due to casino closures during the pandemic and needed $2,000 to cover her back rent. The mother of three couldn't bear the thought of being put out of her apartment with three children in the scorching Nevada desert.

"I had no idea what we were going to do," Kelly said, according to KOAT.

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