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Sometimes the monstrous machine of industry and corporate greed can feel like too much for us as individuals to battle. But a bunch of Canadian citizens has just shown what a committed band of individuals can do.

In the first crowdfunding effort of its kind, Canadians have raised $3 million to purchase a stretch of coastal wilderness in British Columbia to save it from development. The 2,000 acres (800 hectares) of pristine coastline in the Princess Louisa Inlet on British Columbia's Sunshine Coast are virtually untouched. The land includes a fjord, the top rim of which branches into high alpine snow pack forming multiple dramatic waterfalls that run down the rock.

Crowdfunding efforts were organized by B.C. Parks Foundation, a non-profit group whose mission is to protect natural landscapes in the province. The foundation's CEO Andrew Day told the CBC that the land, which is being sold by a private owner, had some interest from logging companies and developers. So people stepped up to stop that from happening.

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via Ostdrossel / Instagram

Lisa is a lifelong bird enthusiast who goes by the name Ostdrossel on social media. A few years ago, the Germany native moved to Michigan and was fascinated by the new birds she encountered.

Upon arriving in the winter, she fell in love with the goldfinches, cardinals, and Blue Jays. Then in the spring, she was taken by the hummingbirds.

"My Dad is a photographer and I have studied media, so it felt like a natural thing to eventually begin experimenting with photography," she told Diply. "The subjects were so beautiful and foreign. I wanted to share with my family and friends in Germany too."

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Although Lisa is secrative about how she takes such stunning photographs, she did give Upworthy an inside look at her camera set-up.

"I am basically using a weatherproof box to which I added a macro lens and put an action camera inside (think GoPro), mine is made by GitUp," she wrote in an email to Upworthy.

Lisa's camera can take photos, video, and is equipped with motion detection and timelapse features.

To lure the birds to the box, she mounts it on a tripod with a baffle underneath to "keep critters from reaching the food," she said. Lisa is also able to attach "various feed containers to" the tripod, such as "glass bowls or hummingbird feeders."

If she leaves the camera out all day, it can take up to 20,000 photos.

"My evening pleasure and routine is to go through all of them, delete the bad ones and keep and slightly edit the ones I deem publishable," she told MyModernMet.

Here are some of the most beautiful, up-close images she's taken.

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Natasha Rossi believed she had the perfect life.

She had two awesome kids — two and a half-year-old identical twins — and the love and support of her boyfriend, Desi. Life, she thought, could only get better.

All photos via Upworthy/Walgreens.

Then, in January 2019, she was hit with some of the hardest news that anyone can hear.

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via Evergreen Hospice Volunteers / Facebook

Hospice nurses seem to come from the heavens. It's a job that requires a big heart, the strength to deal with death on a daily basis, and in-depth medical and nursing training.

Five years ago, Leigh Gardner performed a small miracle for a man that made one of his last days on Earth one of his best

Edward Reis, 62, was an ex-forest ranger with multiple sclerosis and had been in hospice care for years. His caregivers became a surrogate family for Reis who didn't have much family in the area.

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