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Woman Putting Makeup on Face · Free Stock Photo

The holiday season is our favorite time of year. Although 2020 has been strenuous for all of us—you can still celebrate with presents, games, food and booze—but the best part? Glamming it up for the festivities. We're talking mascara, lipstick, eyeliner, shadows, glimmer, highlighters and that extra sparkle and festive cheer. There is no reason that you can't shine with all the fun holiday makeup and save the world while doing it.

Using truly natural, vegan, organic and cruelty-free makeup is a great way to treat your skin and go green—feel good that you are reducing pollution and waste and look flawless in the process. No more toxic chemicals that clog your pores, cause breakouts and make you feel discouraged. From makeup to skincare, here are our favorite eco-friendly products that will put a smile on your glowing face.


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Jane Goodall has had a long and storied career, studying and working with primates for six decades. She is best known for her work with chimpanzees, and it's largely thanks to her field research that we understand as much as we do about their behavior and intelligence.

Goodall has undoubtedly had many notable experiences in her career, but there was one moment caught on video that highlights her extraordinary connection with these animals.

Wounda was a chimpanzee rescued from the bushmeat trade, and when she was brought to the Jane Goodall Institute's Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Republic of Congo, she was half the weight she should have been and near death. (In fact, that's what "Wounda" means—"close to death.")

But thanks to Dr. Rebeca Atencia and the staff at Tchimpounga, Wounda recovered. After rehabilitation, chimps can't go back and live in the wild, but Tchimpounga has some sanctuary islands set aside for rehabbed chimps to live in the forest, safe from attacks and poachers. Wounda was taken to Tchindzoulou island to live with more than a dozen other chimps that had already been released there.

Goodall herself was not part of Wounda's rehabilitation, but she accompanied the team when it came time to release Wounda. She reassured Wounda with a soft voice and kind words on the way to the island, and the two connected immediately, despite it being the first day they met. And when Wounda was released, her expression of gratitude and affection, not only to Dr. Atencia but to Goodall herself, was a sight to behold.

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via Horses in Our Hands

More than 60,000 American wild and domestic horses were needlessly slaughtered for human consumption in 2019. Although they aren't killed in the U.S. due to a ban passed in 2006, horses are often purchased or rounded up by middlemen and taken to Canada or Mexico where they are slaughtered for their meat.

While the idea of eating horse meat sounds disturbing to most Americans, it's considered a delicacy in Mexico, Switzerland, Kazakhstan, Belgium, Japan, Germany, Indonesia, Poland, and China.

The horses are killed or rendered unconscious with gun bolts to the brain before they are bled out and then processed to be shipped out for food.

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via Kyle Burgess / Instagram

Kyle Burgess, 26, recorded a terrifying, six-minute encounter with a cougar (aka mountain lion, puma) on Saturday at Slate Canyon near Provo, Utah. The video shows the cat methodically following Burgess, eventually pouncing at him with her massive claws while hissing.

Burgess was on a ten-mile run through the canyon when he came across some wild kittens. But he soon noticed that they were wild mountain lion cubs and their mother wasn't very happy about him being around.

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