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Looking back on Pat Summitt's legacy and what it means to be a winner.

The former Tennessee women's basketball coach passed away at the age of 64.

Looking back on Pat Summitt's legacy and what it means to be a winner.

For 38 years, Pat Summitt coached the University of Tennessee's women's basketball team, becoming a legend in the process.

She led the Lady Vols to eight NCAA titles and 1,098 wins during her tenure, taking home NCAA Coach of the Year honors seven times.

On the morning of June 28, 2016, she died of complications related to Alzheimer's disease.



Summitt celebrates after Tennessee's 59-46 win against Rutgers in the 2007 NCAA Women's Basketball Championship Game. Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images.

Summitt's legacy isn't just that of a winning coach — she helped changed the game for collegiate women's basketball.

When Summitt took over as Tennessee's head coach ahead of the 1974-75 season, women's basketball wasn't yet recognized by the NCAA.

Until the 1981-82 season, women's basketball teams played in the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW). That year, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), college sports' governing body, integrated a number of women's sports into their roster of activities. This fact will forever link her name to college basketball because her footprints are all over its humble beginnings.

After years of success, Summitt was approached by school officials about the possibility of coaching the men's team.

"Why is that considered a step up?" she responded, pushing back on the idea that women's sports are somehow second-tier.

Summitt stands on the side of the court during a game in her last season as Tennessee's head coach. Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images.

Summitt was more than just a coach. She was a mentor to her players, helping them become well-rounded adults primed for success after college.

Summitt's greatest legacy may very well be the fact that every single player she coached during her time at Tennessee graduated. With a career spanning nearly four decades and 161 players, that's especially impressive.

Summit hugs Candace Parker after Tennessee defeated Stanford during the National Championship Game of the 2008 NCAA Women's Final Four. Photo by Doug Benc/Getty Images.

In August 2011, Summitt announced her retirement from coaching after being diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

She finished the 2011-12 season in a reduced role, but she was there nonetheless. She was named Sports Illustrated's 2011 Sportswoman of the Year, a celebration of her lengthy career achievements. The following year, she was awarded both ESPN's Arthur Ashe Courage Award and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.

Summitt is presented with a Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama on May 29, 2012, at the White House. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

"I've always said you win life with people and I have been so blessed to have great people in my life," Summitt said in 2012. The world is better for her having been in it.

President Biden/Twitter, Yamiche Alcindor/Twitter

In a year when the U.S. saw the largest protest movement in history in support of Black lives, when people of color have experienced disproportionate outcomes from the coronavirus pandemic, and when Black voters showed up in droves to flip two Senate seats in Georgia, Joe Biden entered the White House with a mandate to address the issue of racial equity in a meaningful way.

Not that it took any of those things to make racial issues in America real. White supremacy has undergirded laws, policies, and practices throughout our nation's history, and the ongoing impacts of that history are seen and felt widely by various racial and ethnic groups in America in various ways.

Today, President Biden spoke to these issues in straightforward language before signing four executive actions that aim to:

- promote fair housing policies to redress historical racial discrimination in federal housing and lending

- address criminal justice, starting by ending federal contracts with for-profit prisons

- strengthen nation-to-nation relationships with Native American tribes and Alaskan natives

- combat xenophobia against Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders, which has skyrocketed during the pandemic

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

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Gates Foundation

Once upon a time, a scientist named Dr. Andrew Wakefield published in the medical journal The Lancet that he had discovered a link between autism and vaccines.

After years of controversy and making parents mistrust vaccines, along with collecting $674,000 from lawyers who would benefit from suing vaccine makers, it was discovered he had made the whole thing up. The Lancet publicly apologized and reported that further investigation led to the discovery that he had fabricated everything.

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via TikTok

Menstrual taboos are as old as time and found across cultures. They've been used to separate women from men physically — menstrual huts are still a thing — and socially, by creating the perception that a natural bodily function is a sign of weakness.

Even in today's world women are deemed unfit for positions of power because some men actually believe they won't be able to handle stressful situations while mensurating.

"Menstruation is an opening for attack: a mark of shame, a sign of weakness, an argument to keep women out of positions of power,' Colin Schultz writes in Popular Science.

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