+

John McCain was an American original. He greatest legacy will be his love of bipartisanship.

The world has spent much of the past year saying a long goodbye to John McCain. On Saturday, August 25, he passed away after a long struggle with brain cancer.

He’s leaving behind a personal and professional legacy that places him in the upper echelon of some of our most memorable political leaders beginning his public life as a prisoner of war during the Vietnam War all the way up to becoming the Republican nominee for president in 2008.


But it’s the things he did between those iconic moments that he’ll be most remembered for.

Here are 7 times McCain famously put his country above partisan politics, leaving our country a little better off for it:

He Said No To Racism.

During the 2008 campaign, a supporter at a rally referred to then-candidate Barack Obama as “an Arab” and someone she could not trust as president. Before she could finish her racist rant, McCain took the microphone from her and declared:

"No, ma'am. He's a decent family man [and] citizen that I just happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues and that's what this campaign's all about. He's not [an Arab]."

That wasn't the only time McCain took the high road on race. During the same campaign he refused to engage in attacks on the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, saying that any such moves would be perceived as racially insensitive. McCain was also still sore from when his fellow Republicans went to the lowest of lows by attacking him during the 2000 Republican primary. for adopting a young black girl.

He Fought To Get Money Out Of Politics.

It wasn’t that long ago when leading politicians were willing to say no to the corrupting influence of money in politics. In 2002, McCain and Sen. Russ Feingold (D-WI) helped push through a historic campaign finance bill.

That bill was critically wounded by the Supreme Court’s “Citizens United” decision a few years later but the bipartisan accomplishment is still profound. Consider this: McCain worked on a bill with a Democrat and helped get it passed through a Republican-controlled House of Representatives and signed into law by a Republican president, George W. Bush, whom he had just spent months bitterly fighting with on the campaign trail.

Photo by Lauren Victoria Burke/Getty Images.

He Helped Restore U.S. Relations With Vietnam.

To most of us, the Vietnam War is a distant memory. But the conflict left a huge scar on America’s psyche and McCain was a direct victim of it, having spent years as a prisoner of war inside Vietnam.

Nonetheless, McCain worked to restore diplomatic relations between the two countries in bipartisan fashion with fellow Vietnam veteran Sen. John Kerry (D-MA). Those efforts became a historic reality in 1995, something that likely could not have happened without the contributions of these two men.

Vietnam News Agency/AFP/Getty Images.

He Came Around On Climate Change.

Teddy Roosevelt was one of McCain’s heroes. So, you’d think he would have a great record on environmental issues. That wasn’t always the case. But in more recent years, McCain bucked his party to support efforts to save the Great Barrier Reef and to continue America’s role in the Paris climate agreement, despite President Trump’s objections.

He Took The High Road On Judicial Nominations.

Today, our country is divided over the once basic task of nominating and approving a Supreme Court justice. But there was a time not too long ago when McCain stood in the face of more partisan elements of his own party to help ensure that a president’s judicial nominees got a fair “up or down” vote in U.S. Senate. The move also at least temporarily helped ensure that then-President Bush nominated more moderate judges.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

He’s Got No Time For Trump.

The feud between Trump and McCain started when Trump pathetically mocked McCain’s unshakable record as a war hero. But the split between a man driven by character and principle and a person driven by whatever drives Trump was inevitable. They are polar opposites in nearly every way.

In fact, when Trump was being sworn in as president, McCain visibly spent most of the time hanging out with ... Bernie Sanders.

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images.

Trump may end up outliving the Arizona senator but something tells us it’s McCain who will be having the last laugh.

He Helped Save Obamacare, Despite Not Being A Fan Of It.

During Trump’s first year in the White House he came very close to repealing Obamacare. He had the votes from a Republican-controlled House. But over in the Senate, McCain dramatically refused to support the repeal measure, leading to a humiliating defeat for Trump and even McCain’s fellow Republicans who had promised for years to repeal the healthcare law once they took back control of the White House.

He was also very human, including making plenty of mistakes.

McCain has plenty of critics and they aren’t all named “Donald Trump.” He’s freely admitted to having a checkered past. After all, it was his involvement in the “Keating Five” banking scandal that served as the catalyst for his larger legacy of campaign finance reform and getting “pork barrel spending” out of politics.

He also wasn’t perfect in his personal life.

And there are those who now scoff at the notion of McCain being a “maverick.” This is the same man who picked Sarah Palin to be his vice presidential running mate, despite having a personal preference to pick then Sen. Joe Lieberman (Ind-CT), which would have been a far more independent, brave, and exciting move.

Still, even some of his biggest critics and former rivals are giving tribute to the man and his legacy.

People on the far left and the far right don’t like McCain. That’s called political courage.

McCain is a hero, warts and all. He spent the majority of his political career building bridges across the political aisle, not destroying them.

His service in Vietnam and his bravery as a POW are reason alone to honor his legacy. But his bravery and humanity years later in helping to heal the wounds with a country he fought against is a true testament to leadership and honor.

We’ll never know what McCain would have been like as president. But we got decades of him in the public life and our country is a little more American in the best sense because of it.

All images provided by Bombas

We can all be part of the giving movement

True

We all know that small acts of kindness can turn into something big, but does that apply to something as small as a pair of socks?

Yes, it turns out. More than you might think.

A fresh pair of socks is a simple comfort easily taken for granted for most, but for individuals experiencing homelessness—they are a rare commodity. Currently, more than 500,000 people in the U.S. are experiencing homelessness on any given night. Being unstably housed—whether that’s couch surfing, living on the streets, or somewhere in between—often means rarely taking your shoes off, walking for most if not all of the day, and having little access to laundry facilities. And since shelters are not able to provide pre-worn socks due to hygienic reasons, that very basic need is still not met, even if some help is provided. That’s why socks are the #1 most requested clothing item in shelters.

homelessness, bombasSocks are a simple comfort not everyone has access to

When the founders of Bombas, Dave Heath and Randy Goldberg, discovered this problem, they decided to be part of the solution. Using a One Purchased = One Donated business model, Bombas helps provide not only durable, high-quality socks, but also t-shirts and underwear (the top three most requested clothing items in shelters) to those in need nationwide. These meticulously designed donation products include added features intended to offer comfort, quality, and dignity to those experiencing homelessness.

Over the years, Bombas' mission has grown into an enormous movement, with more than 75 million items donated to date and a focus on providing support and visibility to the organizations and people that empower these donations. These are the incredible individuals who are doing the hard work to support those experiencing —or at risk of—homelessness in their communities every day.

Folks like Shirley Raines, creator of Beauty 2 The Streetz. Every Saturday, Raines and her team help those experiencing homelessness on Skid Row in Los Angeles “feel human” with free makeovers, haircuts, food, gift bags and (thanks to Bombas) fresh socks. 500 pairs, every week.

beauty 2 the streetz, skid row laRaines is out there helping people feel their beautiful best

Or Director of Step Forward David Pinson in Cincinnati, Ohio, who offers Bombas donations to those trying to recover from addiction. Launched in 2009, the Step Forward program encourages participation in community walking/running events in order to build confidence and discipline—two major keys to successful rehabilitation. For each marathon, runners are outfitted with special shirts, shoes—and yes, socks—to help make their goals more achievable.

step forward, helping homelessness, homeless non profitsRunning helps instill a sense of confidence and discipline—two key components of successful recovery

Help even reaches the Front Street Clinic of Juneau, Alaska, where Casey Ploof, APRN, and David Norris, RN give out free healthcare to those experiencing homelessness. Because it rains nearly 200 days a year there, it can be very common for people to get trench foot—a very serious condition that, when left untreated, can require amputation. Casey and Dave can help treat trench foot, but without fresh, clean socks, the condition returns. Luckily, their supply is abundant thanks to Bombas. As Casey shared, “people will walk across town and then walk from the valley just to come here to get more socks.”

step forward clinic, step forward alaska, homelessness alaskaWelcome to wild, beautiful and wet Alaska!

The Bombas Impact Report provides details on Bombas’s mission and is full of similar inspiring stories that show how the biggest acts of kindness can come from even the smallest packages. Since its inception in 2013, the company has built a network of over 3,500 Giving Partners in all 50 states, including shelters, nonprofits and community organizations dedicated to supporting our neighbors who are experiencing- or at risk- of homelessness.

Their success has proven that, yes, a simple pair of socks can be a helping hand, an important conversation starter and a link to humanity.

You can also be a part of the solution. Learn more and find the complete Bombas Impact Report by clicking here.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

Behavior like Norma's is quite common for older folks suffering from Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Walter, another man in the same assisted living facility, demanded breakfast from the staff every night around 7:30.

Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 08.05.21


Six years ago, a high school student named Christopher Justice eloquently explained the multiple problems with flying the Confederate flag. A video clip of Justice's truth bomb has made the viral rounds a few times since then, and here it is once again getting the attention it deserves.

Justice doesn't just explain why the flag is seen as a symbol of racism. He also explains the history of when the flag originated and why flying a Confederate flag makes no sense for people who claim to be loyal Americans.

But that clip, as great as it is, is a small part of the whole story. Knowing how the discussion came about and seeing the full debate in context is even more impressive.

Keep ReadingShow less