Jessica Biel puts a funny twist on the mysteries of sexual health in a new sketch series.

When it comes to birth control, the questions are endless.

Shouldn't birth control come with sound effects so you remember to take it?

Can you get struck by lightning if you have an IUD?


And what's up with the millions of condom sizes these days?

Don't get actress Jessica Biel started on those.

Actually, do. She has some thoughts.


Road trip convo GIF via F--- Yeah Jessica Biel.

Biel has many questions about reproductive health and how the body works — just like you do — and she's bringing them up in a funny and clever way.

In the brand new Funny or Die sketch series for WomanCare Global, Biel is opening the gates to a judgment-free zone for people who have questions about reproductive health. But don't count on her to have all of the answers.

The series "If You Don't Tell Them, Then Who Will?" features Biel and actors Whitney Cummings and Joy Bryant as they sit around, spitballing random thoughts about sex and the body. It's funny and original and helps to break the stigma around sex.

In the series, no question is off limits. And when you think about it, isn't that how we should approach sex ed in the real world?

Too bad that hasn't always been a reality. Biel remembers how humiliating it was when she first got her period in fifth grade. She was in a school play, wearing a gray beard and a pad the size of a skateboard and thinking, "What is happening to me?" She had no idea.


GIF from the one and only "Mean Girls."

Fast forward many years later when her and hubby, Justin Timberlake (ever heard of him?), decided they wanted to bring a baby into our TMZ-, cronut-filled world. And once again, she felt confused.

"Suddenly I realized I really didn't know what's going on inside my own body," she told Glamour. "It was shocking."

She's far from alone. We've all privately Googled stuff about our bodies in hopes we can make sense of what's happening to our insides ... our outsides ... and to each other.

Biel's questions about her own body prompted her to join the initiative to educate women, men, and young people about the different stages of reproductive life — and to get people talking more openly about it.

After all, you can't know what you don't know.

From WomanCare Global:

The tagline, "If You Don't Tell Them, Then Who Will," refers to the parent to child relationship, as well as the exchange of information from partner to partner, and from peer to peer. Each video – which is not meant as an instructional sex education resource – will center on a particular topic illustrating why women and girls should not rely on a random internet search, the media, a celebrity or misinformed friends to steer important decisions about their bodies and reproductive health.

As anti-women's health lawmakers continue their crusade against Planned Parenthood and try to push abstinence-only education into schools across the country, now is the time for us to be open with one another and use fact-based learnings to our society's advantage.

There is nothing more empowering than making informed decisions and being in control of your own destiny.

So do your research, listen to science, support one another, and go be your own awesome self.

And be sure to catch Biel and her crew talk about the pill, IUDs, and condoms. Super short and funny:

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via schmoyoho / YouTube

If there's anything Americans need right now, it's a good laugh. In these divided times, if there is anyone who can provide one, it's "Weird Al" Yankovic.

The good news is he's back with a video that's a rare foray into American politics. Yankovic has avoided the topic throughout his career, although he did some non-partisan lampooning of the 2016 presidential debates with "Bad Hombres, Nasty Women."

In 2015, he told the Washington Times that he stays away from "sensitive" issues like "political topics. "And I don't want to divide my fan base if I can help it," he said.

"The other reason I don't do a lot of political humor is it dates pretty poorly," Yankovic said. "Things that are topical in the political arena this week would be old news a month from now, so that's probably not the kind of thing I want to have as part of my catalog."

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$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

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The recent passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg not only marked the end of an illustrious life of service to law and country, but the beginning of an unprecedented judicial nomination process. While Ginsburg's spot on the Supreme Court sits open, politicians and regular Americans alike argue over whether or not it should be filled immediately, basing their arguments on past practices and partisan points.

When a Supreme Court vacancy came up in February of 2016, nine months before the election, Senate Republicans led by Mitch McConnell refused to even take up a hearing to consider President Obama's pick for the seat, arguing that it was an election year and the people should have a say in who that seat goes to.

Four years later, a mere six weeks before the election, that reasoning has gone out the window as Senate Republicans race to get a nominee pushed through the approval process prior to election day. Now, they claim, because the Senate majority and President are of the same party, it makes sense to proceed with the nomination.

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via Katie Porter

Americans spend about $1,2000 a year on average for prescription drugs. That's more than anywhere else in the world. Private insurers and government programs pick up the bulk of the costs which we then pay through higher taxes and insurance premiums.

A major reason why Americans pay so much more than other countries is that the U.S government isn't allowed to negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies.

To better understand the underlying reasons for these astronomical prices, the U.S. House of Representatives Oversight and Reform Committee held hearings on Wednesday with current and former executives of three major drug companies.

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