Jessica Biel puts a funny twist on the mysteries of sexual health in a new sketch series.

When it comes to birth control, the questions are endless.

Shouldn't birth control come with sound effects so you remember to take it?

Can you get struck by lightning if you have an IUD?


And what's up with the millions of condom sizes these days?

Don't get actress Jessica Biel started on those.

Actually, do. She has some thoughts.


Road trip convo GIF via F--- Yeah Jessica Biel.

Biel has many questions about reproductive health and how the body works — just like you do — and she's bringing them up in a funny and clever way.

In the brand new Funny or Die sketch series for WomanCare Global, Biel is opening the gates to a judgment-free zone for people who have questions about reproductive health. But don't count on her to have all of the answers.

The series "If You Don't Tell Them, Then Who Will?" features Biel and actors Whitney Cummings and Joy Bryant as they sit around, spitballing random thoughts about sex and the body. It's funny and original and helps to break the stigma around sex.

In the series, no question is off limits. And when you think about it, isn't that how we should approach sex ed in the real world?

Too bad that hasn't always been a reality. Biel remembers how humiliating it was when she first got her period in fifth grade. She was in a school play, wearing a gray beard and a pad the size of a skateboard and thinking, "What is happening to me?" She had no idea.


GIF from the one and only "Mean Girls."

Fast forward many years later when her and hubby, Justin Timberlake (ever heard of him?), decided they wanted to bring a baby into our TMZ-, cronut-filled world. And once again, she felt confused.

"Suddenly I realized I really didn't know what's going on inside my own body," she told Glamour. "It was shocking."

She's far from alone. We've all privately Googled stuff about our bodies in hopes we can make sense of what's happening to our insides ... our outsides ... and to each other.

Biel's questions about her own body prompted her to join the initiative to educate women, men, and young people about the different stages of reproductive life — and to get people talking more openly about it.

After all, you can't know what you don't know.

From WomanCare Global:

The tagline, "If You Don't Tell Them, Then Who Will," refers to the parent to child relationship, as well as the exchange of information from partner to partner, and from peer to peer. Each video – which is not meant as an instructional sex education resource – will center on a particular topic illustrating why women and girls should not rely on a random internet search, the media, a celebrity or misinformed friends to steer important decisions about their bodies and reproductive health.

As anti-women's health lawmakers continue their crusade against Planned Parenthood and try to push abstinence-only education into schools across the country, now is the time for us to be open with one another and use fact-based learnings to our society's advantage.

There is nothing more empowering than making informed decisions and being in control of your own destiny.

So do your research, listen to science, support one another, and go be your own awesome self.

And be sure to catch Biel and her crew talk about the pill, IUDs, and condoms. Super short and funny:

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On an old episode of "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in July 1992, Oprah put her audience through a social experiment that puts racism in a new light. Despite being nearly two decades old, it's as relevant today as ever.

She split the audience members into two groups based on their eye color. Those with brown eyes were given preferential treatment by getting to cut the line and given refreshments while they waited to be seated. Those with blue eyes were made to put on a green collar and wait in a crowd for two hours.

Staff were instructed to be extra polite to brown-eyed people and to discriminate against blue-eyed people. Her guest for that day's show was diversity expert Jane Elliott, who helped set up the experiment and played along, explaining that brown-eyed people were smarter than blue-eyed people.

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Oprah's Social Experiment on Her Audience www.youtube.com

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