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Heroes

Hubble has been sending Earth some epic photos. What a difference between 1997 and 2015!

Galaxies crash into each other in space. Here's why you should care.

Space. It's easy to think of it as this static entity, a quiet vacuum, that never really changes save for the occasional shooting star...

Image via Eric E. Castro/Flickr.


...but really, there's a lot of drama happening.

The scrappy Hubble telescope's new camera system, which includes the Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys, is ready to blow the lid on all the space drama.

Hubble recently sent Earth one of the most detailed space photos of the Twin Jet Nebula, a binary star system that also goes by the name of PN M2-9.

Watch as 1997 turns in to 2015, with all the awesome color spectrum to go along with it. With new technology comes better images and better access and better understanding of space drama!

1997:

2015:

Is this a lava lamp? No, it's real life.

Then there's the NGC 6240. It's two galaxies and two black holes that are joining together to form an even bigger black hole (and possibly a bigger galaxy).

Seven years ago it was all browns and blues...


...now it's all detailed with pinks and purples! The folks at Hubble say it looks like a lobster.

This is what two black holes joining into a black hole look like. Lobster!

Whoa!

What a plot twist.

Will this lobster-esque galaxy collision be galactic cannibalism, which is an actual satisfactual scientific term describing situations where the colliding galaxies actually eat each other?!

Or will it be more like galaxy harassment, where one galaxy pretty dramatically flies into another? They are two black holes colliding ... so stay tuned.

Or is it all just a galaxy dance, where all the stars are Martha Graham-ing their way towards a new beginning? That's not a scientific term, but I do like to think about it.

Much like Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, some great stars are just destined to meet.


They grow closer with each passing year! Image via Georges Biard/Wikimedia Commons.

And the reality is, even our own galaxy, the Milky Way, is destined to collide with the Andromeda galaxy in about 5 billion years.

And though we'll all be longer than long gone when it happens, with the help of this new camera and generations of science, we know a little more about THAT before-and-after ... and everything in between.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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