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Your brain literally won't let you win against this optical illusion:

There are 12 black dots in the picture, but I'd bet good money that you'll never be able to see all of them at once. If I squint, I can get four, and only four.

The illusion started taking over the internet after game developer Will Kerslake shared it via Twitter, but the picture itself originally came from the Facebook page of Akiyoshi Kitaoka, a psychology professor in Kyoto, Japan. It appears to be a variation of Ninio's extinction illusion, which is a grid illusion that scientists use to explain a big scientific concept.


Why you can't see all 12 dots? Basically, we can blame evolution.

The back of our eyes are full of light-sensing nerve cells, all crowded together, waiting for stimulation. You might think that when something interesting happens, they'd all start shouting and firing off signals — a furious rush of noise. But that's not what happens.

Instead, excited nerve cells actually kind of "shush" their neighbor cells, a phenomenon called lateral inhibition. They do this because it helps the message get through — if only a few people are shouting, the signal is clearer.

The end result is that our visual contrast goes up, but at the cost of muting whatever we're not looking at.

Meanwhile, our brain tries to be helpful by filling in that incomplete information with whatever it guesses is there. And since most of this picture is grey lines, our brain just leaves out the black dots.

So you're not going crazy, I promise. There really are 12 dots, but our eyes and brains do weird stuff sometimes to help us focus and survive. And as for what it means if you can see more dots than someone else? Well, the science doesn't really tell us much. Maybe you just have a different level of lateral inhibition than them, or maybe your brain is better at filling in the gaps.

Little mind games like this remind us of the limits of our brains.

We often assume seeing is believing, but optical illusions help show that's not true. Scientists are now using optical illusions to study how we perceive the world, why we react to certain things, and why we make quick assumptions. Optical illusions can teach us about bigger subjects like schizophrenia or even racism!

And, if nothing else, they're kind of trippy and fun.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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