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Here's an empowering look at what happens when the funniest women on TV take a pop song literally.

Society often tells women they need to be quiet and polite. Who knew that combining Sara Bareilles and the women of "Saturday Night Live" could make breaking those rules so gratifying?

Here's an empowering look at what happens when the funniest women on TV take a pop song literally.


Sometimes speaking up can be a real challenge, especially if you're a woman. Whether it's a long-lost acquaintance (who you might rather stay lost) asking for your number or just having to ask an embarrassing question, weighing the balance between assertive and aggressive can be a bit of a struggle.


Studies have shown that when men speak up, this is seen as a positive trait; when women do it, they're viewed as pushy. "SNL" took a lighthearted look at what a world where women aren't afraid to "say what they wanna say" might look like.

The examples used include interacting with a long-lost acquaintance, speaking up when a friend tries to shortchange a group on a check, and asking someone for their name a second (or third) time. The examples — complete with slow-motion celebrations — are meant to be a bit tongue-in-cheek, but they represent a larger, more serious issue.

Is this actually a problem?

As Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Professor Adam Grant wrote January in The New York Times, society expects women to be quiet and polite, all the while rewarding men who aren't. What's worse is that when women do speak up, they're often punished instead of praised. That's what makes the "SNL" video so much fun: It's an illustration of women bucking these expectations.

"Suspecting that powerful women stayed quiet because they feared a backlash, [Yale psychologist Victoria] Brescoll looked deeper. She asked professional men and women to evaluate the competence of chief executives who voiced their opinions more or less frequently. Male executives who spoke more often than their peers were rewarded with 10 percent higher ratings of competence. When female executives spoke more than their peers, both men and women punished them with 14 percent lower ratings. As this and other research shows, women who worry that talking 'too much' will cause them to be disliked are not paranoid; they are often right." — Adam Grant and Sheryl Sandberg

So how can we fight these expectations?

The first step to fighting gender bias is acknowledging it. Take a look at the examples shown in the video. What appears rude when a woman does it might be viewed as ambitious when done by a man. Gender bias is the difference between viewing someone as entitled versus ambitious, and it exists everywhere, from the boardroom to the break room. We should celebrate the women who aren't afraid to shake things up and speak their minds.

So speak up and celebrate!

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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Increasingly customers are looking for more conscious shopping options. According to a Nielsen survey in 2018, nearly half (48%) of U.S. consumers say they would definitely or probably change their consumption habits to reduce their impact on the environment.

But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.