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Harriet Tubman and Andrew Jackson seem unlikely modern-day rivals.

Images via Thinkstock and Wikimedia Commons.


Yet, an organization has made them just that: Women on $20s ran a poll to see which woman should replace President Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill, and Harriet Tubman won!

Why a woman?


Image via Thinkstock.

For one, the U.S. has honored many historical figures by placing them on its money — but few women.

While women have been honored with coins, such as Sacagawea on the dollar coin, the lack of any women on paper currency needs to be rectified.

Martha Washington was the only woman to ever appear on American paper money (three times from 1886-1896) ... before women could even vote. Today, only men appear on America's paper currency.

Second, the average American woman's salary is less than a man's.

For every dollar a man makes, a woman takes home about 13-18 cents less. Is it any surprise that we've barely honored women on our money?

Women on $20s is seeking to rectify at least the first discrepancy. Once over 100,000 votes were tallied, the winner was announced:

Harriet Tubman!

Image via Wikimedia Commons (altered).

Runners-up included Eleanor Roosevelt, Rosa Parks, and Wilma Mankiller.

Again, people wondered why. And you might too, maybe.

Even though Harriet Tubman and Andrew Jackson never met, they were rivals.

President Jackson owned slaves (about 150 at the time of his death), and Harriet Tubman freed slaves using the Underground Railroad.

Here's how many slaves she helped to freedom:

Images via Thinkstock.

That's 300 people saved with the help of one Harriet Tubman.

Isn't she a leader worth immortalizing?

via Chewy

Adorable Dexter and his new chew toy. Thanks Chewy Claus.

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Every holiday season, millions of kids send letters asking for everything from a new bike to a pony. Some even make altruistic requests such as peace on Earth or helping struggling families around the holidays.

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Does your dog dream of a month’s supply of treats or chew toys? Would your cat love a new tree complete with a stylish condo? How about giving your betta fish some fresh decor that’ll really tie its tank together?

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Photo by Robert Linder on Unsplash

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The Stars and Stripes, Old Glory, the Star-Spangled Banner — whatever you call it, the United States flag is one of the most recognizable symbols on Earth.

As famous as it is, there's still a lot you might not know about our shining symbol of freedom. For instance, did you know that on some flags, the stars used to point in different directions? Or that there used to be more than 13 stripes? How about a gut-check on all those star-spangled swimsuits you see popping up in stores around the Fourth of July?

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A pediatrician's viral post will bring you to tears and inspire you to be a better person.

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