Group of black peacemakers stop a rioting white teen from breaking a window with his skateboard
via Tanks Good News / Instagram

There have been thousands of demonstrators of all colors and creeds taking it to the streets of over the past week to protest the killing of George Floyd by a Minnesota police officer. A very small group of them have turned the peaceful demonstrations into violent riots by breaking windows, looting and getting into confrontations with police.

These troublemakers are as diverse as the peaceful demonstrators. But when the narrative is told by authorities, people of color will no doubt scapegoated for the violence and destruction.

That's probably why a group of black peacemakers pulled the skateboard out of this white teenager's hands as he attempted to bash in a storefront window.

A great example of black people standing up against those who use the demonstrations as an excuse to vandolize and riot happened over the weekend in Los Angeles when a woman tagged "Black Lives Matter" on Starbucks storefront.

The two protestors were confronted by a black woman who chastised them saying, "Y'all doing that for us and we didn't ask you to do that," she says in the video. "Listen, don't spray stuff over here where they gonna blame black people for this, and black people didn't do it."


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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.