Not ready to talk about the election? Here's 3 pictures you can use to stop conversations.

If you're anything like me, you've spent the better part of today endlessly refreshing Twitter and Facebook, hoping that the next update will magically reverse what just happened to our country.

It won't. Put that out of your mind.

The bad news is clear: Donald Trump won the election. That's a BFD, with potentially serious, negative consequences for a lot of Americans — women, people of color, immigrants, LGBTQ folks, and those living with disabilities.


There's lots of news out there today. Lots of posts from people you know who are angry, sad, frustrated, bitter, and need space to vent. If that's productive for you, you should, by all means, vent to your heart's content. If, however, you're the kind of person for whom reading a steady stream of lamentations drives you further down the rabbit hole of your own despair, please feel free to opt out. If you need time to process, if you need time to let it all sink in before you're ready to talk about it, that's OK.

Right now, you don't have to read about, think about, or talk about the election. Not if you don't want to.

That's right, you don't have to talk about politics with anyone today. You heard it here first. To help you deflect those conversations you're just not ready to have, feel free to share the images below.

If you're a barista and people come by to order coffee, and you just can't stand to hear another "Whoo, boy what an election, right?" comment from someone who really just needs a coffee, slap this down at the register.

Image via iStock.

If you work at a salon and can't stand the thought of having to listen to political chatter while you're cutting someone's hair, tape this to the mirror.

Image via iStock.

If you're a woman, a person of color, an immigrant, living with a disability, part of the LGBTQ community, or literally anyone else who is feeling gut-punched by the election and you just can't handle another person asking if you're OK because even trying to begin answering that question feels too overwhelming to comprehend, feel free to wear this damn thing on your forehead.

Image via iStock.

This is not a permission slip suggesting you can or should ignore the news forever — or get complacent or wish it away.

We just experienced the longest, roughest election in a generation. If you haven't processed everything yet — and really, who has? — take that time now. Go for a walk. Go for a run. Go for an ATV ride. Read a book. On an ATV. You'll feel better. Maybe just a little better, but better.

The information will still be out there tomorrow, the next day, and the day after that. We still have months to digest what happened and start planning for the next steps to ensure that women's reproductive rights stay protected, that our LGBTQ friends can live here in peace with their families, and that our Muslim neighbors are shielded from hate crimes. There is so much more work to be done. And there will be time to do that work.

For now, you can do you.

And that's OK.

Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels
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But while many consumers are interested in spending their money on products that are more sustainable, few actually follow through. An article in the 2019 issue of Harvard Business Review revealed that 65% of consumers said they want to buy purpose-driven brands that advocate sustainability, but only about 26% actually do so. It's unclear where this intention gap comes from, but thankfully it's getting more convenient to shop sustainably from many of the retailers you already support.

Amazon recently introduced Climate Pledge Friendly, "a new program to help make it easy for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products." When you're browsing Amazon, a Climate Pledge Friendly label will appear on more than 45,000 products to signify they have one or more different sustainability certifications which "help preserve the natural world, reducing the carbon footprint of shipments to customers," according to the online retailer.

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If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.