Ellen has COVID-19. As she recovers, it can be a teaching moment for her millions of fans.
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Daytime talk show host Ellen DeGeneres announced she has contracted COVID-19 in a Thursday morning tweet. The announcement comes the day after America had its largest day of deaths caused by the virus.

Over 3,000 Americans succumbed to COIVD-19 on Wednesday. For some perspective, that's more in a single day than were killed in the 9/11 attacks.

DeGeneres joins the 15.4 million Americans who've contracted the virus.


"Hi Everyone," DeGeneres wrote. "I want to let you all know that I tested positive for Covid-19. Fortunately, I'm feeling fine right now. Anyone who has been in close contact with me has been notified, and I am following all proper CDC guidelines. I'll see you all again after the holidays. Please stay healthy and safe."

Her announcement set a good example for the country because it showed she's handling her illness responsibly by following CDC guidelines.

DeGeneres now has the opportunity to be a good role model by sharing the realities of the disease and how she's keeping herself and those around her safe.

Celebrities like DeGeneres who are a daily part of so many people's lives are in the unique position to affect how the public views the pandemic. The talk show host has an audience of millions and can be a valuable spokesperson to encourage people to wear masks and social distance.

When Tom Hanks and his wife Rita Wilson caught the coronavirus back in March, it was eye-opening for many. Understanding their responsibility to the public, they didn't shy away from sharing their experiences with the virus.

Hanks has since used his fame to remind people of the importance of mask-wearing.

Back in March, before the virus hit its first peak, DeGeneres taught her jam-packed studio audience how to wash their hands to avoid catching the virus.

"I like to keep you up to date on all the latest viral trends," the host told her audience. "And there's a big one sweeping the world right now — it's not a good one — I'm talking about the coronavirus."

"If you haven't heard of it, raise your filthy hand," she joked.

Ellen Wants to Help Protect You from Getting Coronavirus www.youtube.com

In October, "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" was one of the first television shows to return from COVID-induced hiatus with a live in-studio audience. The show allows around 40 people to sit in an audience with a capacity of 300.

The show also has occasional in-studio guests.

DeGeneres announcement comes as her show is experiencing a ratings free-fall after reports of a toxic work environment have plagued it for the past year. A recent report by Buzzfeed revealed that prominent stars have turned down appearances on the show due to its negative reputation and that advertisers are leery of being associated with DeGeneres' tarnished brand.

A spokesperson from Telepictures says the show will stop taping new episodes until January and will air repeat episodes instead.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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Sperm whales are uniquely shaped, with humongous, block-shaped heads that house the largest brains in the animal world. Like other cetaceans, sperm whale babies rely on their mother's milk for sustenance in their first year or two. And also like other cetaceans, a sperm whale mama's nipple is inverted—it doesn't stick out from her body like many mammals, but rather is hidden inside a mammary slit.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less