Dozens of people on Reddit are saying 'Thanks, Obama.' For real.

Approximately one year ago, the "Thanks Obama" subreddit was a repository for absurd memes blaming President Obama for everything from traffic tickets to snowstorms, framed as snarky, lighthearted commentary on the president's legacy.

Posts from 2015 sarcastically chide the president for posters' rough, dry feet, tearing grocery bags, and inability to unsuccessfully unwrap a muffin. The forum shut down nearly a year ago, after President Obama acknowledged the "Thanks, Obama" meme in a Facebook video. Users on the forum decided the meme had run its course.

In the wake of the 2016 presidential election, the ThanksObama subreddit has come back to life. Though today, the posts look ... a little different.

After nearly a year of inactivity, in anticipation of President Obama's final months in office, Reddit users are using the forum to finally thank him — for real this time.

Messages include thank-you notes to the president for "simply trying to do the right thing," for "being a pretty cool guy," and for keeping his cool while attending to a peaceful transition to the next administration (expressed in somewhat more colorful terms).

Users also thanked the president for "being a feminist," and they thanked Sasha and Malia Obama for sharing their dad with the country.

The list goes on — Redditors praised the president for standing up for LGBT rights:

His appreciation of the arts:

And, perhaps most importantly, for "giving us hope in dark times:"

Taken together, the thanks comprise an endearingly informal log of what the president, and the United States, have accomplished in the past eight years.

It can be easy to lose sight of the progress our country has made in just two presidential terms. In the first year of Obama's administration, unemployment had reached 10%, 20 million fewer people had health insurance, only two states had legalized marriage equality, and we had yet to commit ourselves — and the world — to doing anything significant about climate change.

In ThanksObama, policy victories like affordable health care and economic growth share top billing on the thread with less tangible positives — a White House that conducted itself with decency and dignity, a firm diplomatic style, and a lack of embarrassing scandal and drama.

It's an inspiring read, regardless of your politics.

The message to the president is clear: Sure, we may have teased you, and we didn't all agree with you all the time, but you were solid for us. You don't mind a good joke, and we respect the hell out of that.

Some things — and people — you don't appreciate till they're almost gone. Presidents are no different. For years, President Obama has been the (often self-aware) butt of a lighthearted gag. It was cool of him to be cool about it.

GIF by The White House

Now, President Obama is modeling how to say good-bye graciously, with a peaceful transition of power. Regardless of whether you ever supported the man or not, that's something to commend in a leader.

Thanks, Obama.

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

ZACHOR Foundation

"What's 'the Holocaust'?" my 11-year-old son asks me. I take a deep breath as I gauge how much to tell him. He's old enough to understand that prejudice can lead to hatred, but I can't help but feel he's too young to hear about the full spectrum of human horror that hatred can lead to.

I wrestle with that thought, considering the conversation I recently had with Ben Lesser, a 91-year-old Holocaust survivor who was just a little younger than my son when he witnessed his first Nazi atrocity.

It was September of 1939 and the Blitzkrieg occupation of Poland had just begun. Ben, his parents, and his siblings were awakened in their Krakow apartment by Nazi soldiers who pistol-whipped them out of bed and ransacked their home. As the men with the shiny black boots filled burlap sacks with the Jewish family's valuables, a scream came from the apartment across the hall. Ben and his sister ran toward the cry.

They found a Nazi swinging their neighbors' baby upside down by its legs, demanding that the baby's mother make it stop crying. As the parents screamed, "My baby! My baby!" the Nazi smirked—then swung the baby's head full force into the door frame, killing it instantly.

This story and others like it feel too terrible to tell my young son, too out of context from his life of relative safety and security. And yet Ben Lesser lived it at my son's age. And it was too terrible—for anyone, much less a 10-year-old. And it was also completely out of context from the life of relative safety and security Ben and his family had known before the Nazi tanks rolled in.

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

1 / 12

Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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Same-sex marriage is legal in America and these days 63% of all Americans support the idea. Ten years ago, it was still a controversial issue among Democrats, but in 2019, 79% say they support same-sex marriage.

The issue played a big role in the Democratic primary for the Delaware's House of Representatives 27th district race. On September 15, Eric Morrison defeated incumbent Earl Jacques in a landslide and gay rights was a central issue.

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