Constance Wu describes exactly what's wrong with Casey Affleck's Oscar nod.

'I'm a woman & human first. That's what my craft is built on.'

You may recognize actor Constance Wu.

She stars in "Fresh Off the Boat," the groundbreaking ABC sitcom that's been praised for giving a TV voice to the Asian-American experience (and for its downright hilarity).

Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for The Critics' Choice Awards.


You may also recognize actor and director — and younger brother to Ben — Casey Affleck.

Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images.

While Casey Affleck's been a standout in the indie-filmmaking scene for a while, it wasn't until more recently that he gained national recognition (aside from having a very famous big sibling) for his performances in films like "Gone Baby Gone."

Now, he's an Oscar favorite to win Best Actor for his performance in "Manchester by the Sea."

You may or may not also know that Affleck has been accused of sexual assault.

In 2010, two women who'd worked with him on the set of "I'm Still Here" said they were harassed by Affleck, according to The Hollywood Reporter. The accusations ranged "from incredibly unprofessional behavior to actual physical intimidation," The Daily Beast reported, detailing the troubling allegations. Affleck denied wrongdoing.

The suits were eventually dismissed after all parties agreed on an undisclosed settlement.

Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images.

With all the recent Oscar buzz over his nod for "Manchester by the Sea," the idea that Affleck may have taken advantage of his position of authority on set to harass women has understandably disturbed many both inside and outside of Hollywood.

Constance Wu is one of them.

Speaking candidly on Twitter, Wu dug into Affleck for the allegations against him and criticized the Academy for overlooking the actor's troubling past.

First, she (sarcastically) pointed out why guys should all consider buying their way out of trouble, with a real reminder that just because something is settled "out of court" doesn't mean it didn't happen.

Then, she pointed out why, in Hollywood, being a good actor often seems to trump being a good person.

Finally, she shared a powerful statement detailing why, exactly, Casey Affleck's Oscar nomination feels so wrong. "Casey Affleck's win will be a nod to Trump's," Wu tweeted with the note.

As Wu argues, Affleck's excellent performance in "Manchester by the Sea" should stand out completely separate from his eligibility to win an award that's devoted to honoring the craft of acting. After all, "the absence of awards [doesn't] diminish a great performance."

"Art doesn't exist for the sake of awards," she wrote. "But awards DO exist to honor all that art is trying to accomplish in life. So context matters."

In honoring Affleck with a nomination (or a win), Wu argues that the Academy is overlooking — and reinforcing — the entertainment industry's systemic, widespread, and often hidden mistreatment of women. And that's a problem.

Wu — whose sitcom airs on the same network that will broadcast the Oscars —  took a risk in choosing to speak out against Affleck.

But, as she noted, she's a woman and human before she's an actor.

The only way sexual harassment can thrive is if survivors and their allies are silenced.

Speaking out the way Wu did takes guts. As the 2016 election showed perfectly, survivors of assault are often mocked, deemed untrustworthy, and even blamed for their attackers' actions. Survivors don't speak out for the attention — they speak out for justice.

Through her Twitter feed, Wu showed the world how to stand up to sexual harassment and why it's crucial we all put being human before our own personal interests.

Most Shared
Courtesy of Houseplant.

In America, one dumb mistake can hang over your head forever.

Nearly 30% of the American adult population — about 70 million people — have at least one criminal conviction that can prevent them from being treated equally when it comes to everything from job and housing opportunities to child custody.

Twenty million of these Americans have felony convictions that can destroy their chances of making a comfortable living and prevents them from voting out the lawmakers who imprisoned them.

Many of these convictions are drug-related and stem from the War on Drugs that began in the U.S. '80s. This war has unfairly targeted the minority community, especially African-Americans.

Keep Reading Show less
Culture

Climate change is happening because the earth is warming at an accelerated rate, a significant portion of that acceleration is due to human activity, and not taking measures to mitigate it will have disastrous consequences for life as we know it.

In other words: Earth is heating up, it's kinda our fault, and if we don't fix it, we're screwed.

This is the consensus of the vast majority of the world's scientists who study such things for a living. Case closed. End of story.

How do we know this to be true? Because pretty much every reputable scientific organization on the planet has examined and endorsed these conclusions. Thousands of climate studies have been done, and multiple peer-reviewed studies have been done on those studies, showing that somewhere between 84 and 97 percent of active climate science experts support these conclusions. In fact, the majority of those studies put the consensus well above 90%.

Keep Reading Show less
Nature
via James Anderson

Two years ago, a tweet featuring the invoice for a fixed boiler went viral because the customer, a 91-year-old woman with leukemia, received the services for free.

"No charge for this lady under any circumstances," the invoice read. "We will be available 24 hours to help her and keep her as comfortable as possible."

The repair was done by James Anderson, 52, a father-of-five from Burnley, England. "James is an absolute star, it was overwhelming to see that it cost nothing," the woman's daughter told CNN.

Keep Reading Show less
Heroes

I live in a family with various food intolerances. Thankfully, none of them are super serious, but we are familiar with the challenges of finding alternatives to certain foods, constantly checking labels, and asking restaurants about their ingredients.

In our family, if someone accidentally eats something they shouldn't, it's mainly a bit of inconvenient discomfort. For those with truly life-threatening food allergies, the stakes are much higher.

I can't imagine the ongoing stress of deadly allergy, especially for parents trying to keep their little ones safe.

Keep Reading Show less
popular