Busy Philipps perfectly responds to mom-shamers who called her new tattoo 'inappropriate.'
via Shutterstock

A few days ago, Busy Philipps showed off her new tattoo on Instagram. As with any celebrity tattoo the comments ran the gamut from outright supportive to speculative and judgmental.

The irony, of course, is that people's constant judgment is precisely what Philipps' tattoo addresses, so critiquing her choice is essentially proving the its point.

The brand new tattoo features her favorite illustration for her upcoming memoir "This Will Only Hurt A Little," and embodies the ethos Philipps has adopted into her own life.

Allowing other people's opinions to dictate your life can be a prison for anyone, but the pressure is multiplied when you're a woman in the public eye.

A lot of her fans loved the tattoo and the carefree message it spread.

via Busy Phillips / Instagram

via Busy Phillips / Instagram

But there were some critics concerned about what Philipps' two children would glean from the profanity.

via Busy Phillips / Instagram

After receiving several responses concerned about how the tattoo's use of the F-word might influence Philipps' children, she jumped in to share exactly what she plans on telling the kids.

via Busy Phillips / Instagram

Philipps was quick to share that she has no intention of hiding the tattoo from her kids, but instead will openly share the sentiment with them.

via Busy Phillips / Instagram

Her unapologetic response fully summed up why she got the tattoo, there is simply no time to care about the opinions of strangers, and ironically, that won over the comments section.

via Busy Phillips / Instagram

This article was originally published by our partners at someecards.

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