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"That's not very flattering."

It's a phrase so many women are used to reading, hearing, and even thinking when it comes to the ways we dress, style our hair, wear (or don't wear) makeup, and a whole lot more.

Just for fun, I googled the words "fashion magazine advice: flatter," and here were the top six results:


  1. How to Dress 10 Pounds Thinner
  2. Fashion for Petite Women: Top 5 List of Styles for You
  3. How to Dress a Short Torso
  4. Fashion Tips For Body Types
  5. Be Fashionable After 60: Clothing Advice for Older Women
  6. Tips to Flatter Your Size 14 Figure

Sigh.

Mallorie Dunn is pretty much over women being told what they "should" and "should not" wear.

She's a fashion designer and the woman behind the clothing brand SmartGlamour. Her clothing company, which launched almost two years ago, is about more than just clothes — way more.

"SmartGlamour is a body positive clothing line of customizable, ethically made pieces from XXS to 6X and beyond," Dunn tells me in an email interview. "We promote self acceptance and empowerment for women!"

How?

"We use models (experienced and not) of every size, shape, age, height, weight, ethnicity, ability, and identity to wear our clothing, and we never Photoshop them."

In one of her blog posts, Dunn wrote about the word "flattering" and "society's contextual definition of it."

All photos provided by Mallorie Dunn. Shared with permission.

The responses she got inspired her to push back against the negative messages women hear all too often by launching a social media campaign about what "flattering" really means.

In her blog post, Dunn asked women to share their experiences of when someone else decided they knew more about the women's bodies than the women knew themselves.

"So many responses rolled in!" Dunn says.

The blog post and the responses to it were the inspiration Dunn's latest project, #ImFlattered, in which she pulled together a diverse group of women and designed custom pieces from SmartGlamour's collection to highlight — rather than hide — the things people told them were "unflattering" to their body types.

"The process was cathartic, joyful, and empowering for all!" she says.

Here are nine of the models pushing back against unwanted advice they were given about how to dress in a "flattering" way and totally rocking Dunn's designs.

Check them out!

1. Marcy

"Big girls shouldn't wear prints."

2. Wendy

"Sorry to tell you, but don't you think that's a bit too tight and short for a woman your age!!!"

3. Mikaela

"Put the 'girls' away!"

4. Celia

"Your shoulders are too broad to wear halter tops."

5. Mara

"You're too old to go sleeveless!!"

6. Linni

"Hide your arms. They're a problem."

7. Liz

"Nobody wants to look at that."

8. Bethany

"You're too widefor sparkles."

9. Nikki

"You should only show your stomach when you have the body for it."


I'd say confidence is the most flattering look of all.

And the women in this campaign have it.

"Women are constantly told to be smaller, younger, thinner, whiter, quieter. This campaign is all about allowing women to be exactly who they are and want to be — and celebrating it!" Dunn says. "I am hoping to not only prove the 'experts' wrong about their 'advice' but also to firmly plant the message that your happiness, presentation, worth, beauty, and confidence are up to you and you alone."

Can I get an amen?!

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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