Billie Lourd shared a touching photo of her baby watching grandma Carrie Fisher for 'Star Wars' Day
via Jimivr / Flickr and Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Actress Billie Lourd paid tribute to her late mother Carrie Fisher on Tuesday by sharing a photo of her son Kingston watching Fisher as Princess Leia in 1977's "Star Wars: A New Hope."

Kingston was born last September to Lourd and her fiancé, actor Austen Rydell. The infant is pictured wearing a knitted hat with buns on its side and a Leia-themed onesie.




via PrisetheLourd / Instagram

Unfortunately, Fisher died in December 2016 at the age of 60 after suffering cardiac arrest on a plane. Her mother, actress Debbie Reynolds, tragically died the next day at the age of 84. Fisher played Princess Leia in six "Star Wars" films. Her final, posthumous performance in 2019's "Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker" was cobbled together using footage of her taken for other films.

Lourd co-starred with Fisher in all three of the films in the Star Wars sequel trilogy in the role of Lieutenant Connix. She auditioned for the lead role of Rey, but it went to Daisy Ridley.

Lourd has also starred in the Fox horror-comedy series "Scream Queens" and the FX horror anthology series "American Horror Story."

The actress got to play her mother's iconic role of Princess Leia in a brief flashback scene in "The Rise of Skywalker." Lourd's face was digitally replaced with an image of Fisher taken from 1983's "Return of the Jedi."

Lourd shared the photo to commemorate "Star Wars" Day, also known as "May the Fourth," a play on words using the films' catchphrase "May the force be with you."

Over the past decade, "Star Wars" fans have celebrated the popular film franchise on May 4. Since 2013, The Walt Disney Company has commemorated the holiday with "Star Wars" events. On May 4, 2021, it premiered an animated series "Star Wars: The Bad Batch" to coincide with the holiday.




Some fans have turned the holiday into a two-day celebration by commemorating "Revenge of the Fifth" or "Revenge of the Sixth" in the days after the fourth. The secondary celebrations are plays on the title of the third film in the series, "Revenge of the Sith."

It's believed that the phrase "May the fourth be with you," was first used in 1979, when the U.K. Conservative Party paid for a newspaper advertisement saying, "May the Fourth Be With You, Maggie. Congratulations!" to celebrate the party's general election victory.

It's unclear whether this was young Kingston's first time seeing his grandmother as Princess Leia, but it probably won't be his last. The child has no idea that he's been born into Hollywood royalty.

"Star Wars" first came out nearly 44 years ago and the film franchise is as popular as ever. There's no doubt that Carrie Fisher will continue to inspire future generations with her portrayal of one of the most memorable strong female characters ever committed to film.



Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Ready for the weekend? Of course, you are. Here's our weekly dose of good vibes to help you shed the stresses of the workweek and put yourself in a great frame of mind.

These 10 stories made us happy this week because they feature amazing creativity, generosity, and one super-cute fish.

1. Diver befriends a fish with the cutest smile

Hawaiian underwater photographer Yuki Nakano befriended a friendly porcupine fish and now they hang out regularly.

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