Are you a fan of dumplings, cartoons, and amazing women? Pixar's about to make your day.

If you’re a fan of dumplings, amazing women, and history-making films, Pixar is totally about to make your day.


Domee Shi will become the first woman to direct a Pixar short film.  

The Chinese-Canadian director wrote and directed they upcoming eight-minute short — the longest short in Pixar’s history. According to Eater, the film “will center on the ups and downs of the parent-child relationship through the colorful, rich, and tasty lens of the Chinese immigrant community in Canada." “Bao” will focus on an “empty-nesting Chinese mom” who makes a dumpling baby that comes to life and teaches her that “nothing stays cute and small forever.” The short film will show before the “Incredibles 2,” which hits theaters worldwide on June 15, 2018, and has already been credited with showcasing a feminist storyline.

Cue all of the inevitable cuteness (and hunger).

Image via iStock.

Shi’s rise to this moment is pretty inspiring. The director was born in China and moved with her parents to Toronto, Canada, when she was only 2 years old. She's been illustrating for a while and regularly showcases her work online.

A father's love 😅

A post shared by domeeshi (@domeeshi) on

Shi started working as an intern at Pixar and was soon hired as a story artist on "Inside Out." Her Pixar resume includes work on "The Good Dinosaur," "Incredibles 2," and the upcoming "Toy Story 4." In 2015, Shi pitched ideas for several short films and soon received a green light to write and direct "Bao."

Social media fans were pretty excited and quick to praise Pixar for committing to telling diverse stories for viewers.

The historic news about Shi’s huge accomplishment comes at an exciting time for female directors and filmmakers. New reports show that women are directing more TV pilots and making history at the box office. But it's also important for another reason too.            

Shi's short film will be yet another much-needed form of representation for underrepresented groups.    

Children of many backgrounds strongly benefit from seeing shows and films that reflect their identity. As filmmakers continue to explain why representation matters, Shi's film will be an important opportunity for Chinese-Canadian people to see themselves portrayed in a beautiful and relatable way.

And we are totally here for that.

Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
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