Amy Schumer just completely owned a sexist heckler — and there's video.

Apparently, the news that you don't come at Amy Schumer unless you prefer to be rapidly reduced to a smoking heap of ash and ruin hasn't reached Sweden.

For the average male audience member, deciding whether or not to shout "Show us your tits" at Schumer might seem like a tough call.

On one hand, you've paid a lot of money and traveled a long way to see Schumer perform, and by shouting, you basically guarantee yourself titanic humiliation at the hands of a skilled professional whose job is to carve up your ego into tiny bite-size chunks.

On the other hand, she has boobs, and you want to see them because to you, she is a walking, talking pair of boobs.


In this case, the outcome was the carving up you'd basically expect.

Schumer graciously invited the dude to join her on stage. He, being a coward, declined.

Undaunted, the comedian went a few rounds mercilessly mocking his career and his T-shirt before gently warning him to shut up or be thrown out.

He couldn't shut up, so she threw him out. And the crowd went bananas.

Schumer has a long history of dealing with sexism, and not just from random Swedish hecklers...

Photo by Bryan Bedder/Getty Images.

...including efforts by publications to label her size, interviewers calling her character in "Trainwreck" a "skanky" dresser, and fans suggesting that she should be sexually available to everyone and everything because she talks about sex a lot on her TV show.

So it's no surprise that she came prepared with the proper toolkit to neutralize the inevitable bro-terruption.

One part confidence, one part jokes, and 10 parts brutal mockery.

And of course, the kicker —

"I'll show my tits when I want to."

You come at the queen, you best not miss.

Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images.

(Seriously, though. Don't come at the queen. Just enjoy the damn show, everyone. It's what you paid for.)

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