After a 24-year-absence, Adam Sandler returned to SNL and sang a touching tribute to Chris Farley.

“Saturday Night Live” tied its season high for ratings on Saturday, May 4th with an episode that marked the return of comedian Adam Sandler.

The "Billy Madison" star was fired in 1995 after a five-year run on the show, and returned to host for the first time. During his monologue, he joked that after his firing his eventually won out when his films grossed a combined $4 billion.

Sandler's appearance came on this heels of his popular Netflix special, “100% Fresh,” which marked the comedian's return to stand-up comedy.


In the "Romano Tours" sketch, Sandler played an American tour guide who fights back against negative reviews of his Italian tours. “If you're sad now, you might still feel sad there, okay?” Sandler said in a perfect deadpan. “You are still gonna be you on vacation.”

He also reprised his role of “Opera Man” on “Weekend Update.”

But the night will be forever remembered for a moving tribute he paid to his former SNL co-star and friend, Chris Farley. Farley died of a drug overdose in 1997 at 33 years old.

Towards the end of the show, Sandler strapped on his acoustic guitar and sang a tribute he originally performed on his Netflix special.

The song referenced some of Farley’s most memorable SNL sketches, including Matt Foley who “lived in a van down by the river.” It also recounted Farley’s life-of-the-party antics and substance abuse issues.

"Chris Farley Song"

The first time I saw him he was sweeter than honey

Plaid jacket and belt too tight

He wasn't even being funny

Then he cartwheeled around the room

And slow danced with the cleaning lady

He was a one man party

You know I'm talking about

I'm talking about my friend Chris Farley

On a Saturday night my man would always deliver

Whether he was the bumblebee girl

Or living in a van down by the river

He loved the Bears and he could dance

That Chippendales with Swayze

When they replaced his coffee with Folgers

He went full on crazy

The sexiest gap girl

Without him there'd be no lunch lady

In lunch lady land

Oh, I'm thinking about

I'm thinking about my boy

Chris Farley

After a show he'd drink a quarter Jack Daniels

And stick the bottle up his ass

But, hangover as hell

That Catholic boy would still show up to morning mass

We tell him "Slow down, you'll end up like Belushi and Candy"

He said 'Those guys are my heroes, that's all fine and dandy"

I ain't making that stuff up

That's the truth about my friend

Chris Farley

I saw him in the office crying with his headphones on

Listening to a KC And The Sunshine Band song

I said "Buddy, how the hell is that making you so sad"

Then he laughed and said "Just thinking about my dad"

The last big hang we had was at Timmy Meadows wedding party

We laughed all night long, all because of Farley

But a few months later the party came to an end

We flew out to Madison to bury our friend

Nothing was harder than saying goodbye

Except watching Chris' father have his turn to cry

Hey buddy, life's moved on but you still bring us so much joy

Make my kids laugh with your Youtube clips or "Tommy Boy"

And when they ask me who's the funniest guy I ever knew

I tell hands down without a doubt it's you

Yeah, I miss hanging out watching you trying to get laid

But most of all I miss watching you torture Spade

You 're a legend like you wanted

But I wish you were still here with me

And we would get on to shoot "Grown Ups 3"

Yeah, life ain't the same without you boy

And that's why I'm singing about

I'm singing about my boy Chris Farley

And if you make enough noise

Maybe he'll hear us

Give it up for the great

Chris Farley
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When I found out I was pregnant in October 2018, I had planned to keep the news a secret from family for a little while — but my phone seemed to have other ideas.

Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

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via Good Humor and the Library of Congress

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Mozilla
True
Firefox

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Within just a few hours of finding out the news, I was being bombarded with ads for baby gear, baby clothes and diapers on Facebook, Instagram and pretty much any other site I visited — be it my phone or on my computer.

Good thing my family wasn't looking over my shoulder while I was on my phone or my secret would have been ruined.

I'm certainly not alone in feeling like online ads can read your mind.

When I started asking around, it seemed like everyone had their own similar story: Brian Kelleher told me that when he and his wife met, they started getting ads for wedding rings and bridal shops within just a few weeks. Tech blogger Snezhina Piskov told me that she started getting ads for pocket projectors after discussing them in Messenger with her colleagues. Meanwhile Lauren Foley, a writer, told me she started getting ads for Happy Socks after seeing one of their shops when she got off the bus one day.

When online advertising seems to know us this well, it begs the question: are our phones listening to us?

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Photo by Mahir Uysal on Unsplash

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